Tag "berlinale"

Berlinale 2016 Review: WE ARE NEVER ALONE Delivers A Powerful, Harrowing And Way Too Vivid Parable

Petr Václav, the Czech filmmaker living and working in France, returns to the theme of racial discrimination already addressed in his feature debut Marian (1996). Prejudice based on race persists as a hot topic in the Czech Republic, attracting ever... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Berlinale 2016 Review: GENIUS Proves That Not All Talent Translates

Elvis Costello famously quipped, "writing about music is like dancing about architecture", and while I hardly agree with the overall sentiment -- if I did, I wouldn't exactly be doing this -- his point is well taken. Success in... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Berlinale 2016 Review: First, SOY NERO Dazzles, Then It Disappoints

How important is a single shot? Not a sequence, nor an edit. Can a solitary, unbroken shot make or break a film? Can it upend one's total reception of a work? Because there is a shot at the very beginning... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Berlinale 2016 Review: BADEN BADEN, A Promising Yet Frustrating Debut

An amiably aimless jaunt set in the French city of Strasbourg (and not the German spa town of its title) Baden Baden has much in common with its main character, an amiably aimless misfit just coasting through life. Both main... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Berlinale 2016 Review: THINGS TO COME Artfully Tells A Tale As Old As Time

Everything new is old again (or is it the other way around?) in Mia Hansen-Love's elegant and understated take on the cycles of life, Things To Come. With an astute eye and a sensitive-if-hardly-mushy script, Hansen-Love lets us know... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Berlinale 2016 Review: THE WORLD OF US, A Complex And Compelling Children's Tale

Following the enormous promise shown in her terrific shorts Guest (2011) and Sprout (2013), director Yoon Ga-eun delivers in spades with her feature-length debut The World of Us, a beautiful look at the undulating friendships and rivalries between a trio... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Berlinale 2015 Review: 45 YEARS, A Heart-Wrenching Look At Late Marriage

How much can, or should we, let the past affect the present? If our lives went one way instead of another, can we mourn too much what we didn't have? If you think you were not your spouse's only great... More »
  

Berlinale 2015 Review: NOBODY WANTS THE NIGHT: A Beautiful But Flawed Epic

Spanish auteur Isabel Coixet (Elegy, My Life Without Me) opened Berlinale with her latest and most ambitious film to date, Nobody Wants the Night. Based on real life persons (though it was unclear whether the events actually occurred), it is... More »
  

Poster Premiere For Sam de Jong's PRINCE

The Netherlands has been producing a remarkable amount of impressive young talent over the past few years and it would appear that now is the time to add Sam de Jong's name to that list. de Jong makes his feature... More »
By Todd Brown   
  

Berlinale 2014 Review: SPROUT's Short and Sweet Seoul Odyssey

A little girl's trip to the market becomes a charming journey through modern Korea in Yoon Ga-eun's delightful short film Sprout, which premiered at the Busan International Film Festival last October. Korean indie cinema often makes a point of demonstrating... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Berlinale 2014 Review: HISTORY OF FEAR Is Brooding, Atmospheric, And Glacially Slow

History of Fear is set in an unnamed Argentine suburb, an idyllic community where rich families' vast estates are bordered on every side by barbwire fences and imposing gates. The presumed effect is to keep the people inside safe, but... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Berlinale 2014 Review: THE TWO FACES OF JANUARY Proves Middlebrow Is Timeless

They've been making movies like The Two Faces of January since before they made movies. A graying man, his blonde haired bride, and the younger cad who comes between them. Crime and chase amidst sun dappled vistas. Cops and con... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Berlinale 2014 Review: Grand and Hypnotic, A DREAM OF IRON Won't Soon Be Forgotten

Early on in A Dream of Iron, a new documentary premiering at the Berlin International Film Festival this year, director Kelvin Kyung Kun Park shows us images a whales moving through the vast blue expanse of the ocean - enormous... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Berlinale 2014 Review: THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL, An Ode To Joy

Regrettably, Beethoven got there first. In another world, The Grand Budapest Hotel, a celebration of wit and style and class, an example of a technical master working at the top of his craft, a work as warm and genuinely funny... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Berlinale 2014 Review: THE MIDNIGHT AFTER, Fruit Chan's Maddening Pop-Art Apocalypse

It should have been clear as soon as the title, "Based on the novel by PIZZA", rolled onscreen. Fruit Chan's The Midnight After was sure to be loopy, irreverent and a rare kind of crazy. And it was! But... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Berlinale 2014 Review: Subdued Yet Powerful, NIGHT FLIGHT Soars

LeeSong Hee-il returns to Berlin a year after White Night (2012) with his fourth feature Night Flight. While his last film was a subdued but powerful work about lingering memories of homophobia in modern Seoul, his new film is his... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Christophe Gans' BEAUTY AND THE BEAST And Richard Linklater's BOYHOOD Added To Berlin Fest Lineup

High-profile titles, including the latest from Christophe Gans (Beauty and the Beast), Richard Linklater (Boyhood), Yamada Yoji (The Little House), and Hans Petter Moland (In Order of Disappearance) have been added to the lineup for the rapidly-approaching Berlin International Film... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

BEYOND BEYOND: Watch Four Clips From The Berlin Selected Animation

Danish director Esben Toft Jacobsen - known in these parts for his debut feature The Great Bear - is once again selected as part of the Berlin Film Festival with his sophomore feature Beyond Beyond and we're pleased to present... More »
By Todd Brown   
  

Berlin Announces First Batch Of Films

Because February really isn't that far away, the 2014 edition of the Berlin International Film Festival announced 28 films, 19 of which will be playing in their Panorama section, 5 in competition, and 4 in the Berlinale Special section which... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Viennale 2013 Review: I USED TO BE DARKER, A Worthwile Drifter Film Without Too Much Movement

With Matthew Porterfield, it is all about drifting and floating, just that there is not much travelling going on. A dreamy feeling of detachment conquers I Used To Be Darker and makes it a cinematographic pleasure. Undoubtedly the film does... More »
  
 
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