Internationl Reviews - Foreign, Overseas

Review: DEADPOOL, A Marvellous Meta Movie With A Mouth

Although it is cut from the same cloth as other superhero origin stories before it, both in the MCU (Marvel Cinematic Universe) and X-Men world, Deadpool prefers its material vibrant, filled with polka dots and stained with blood. Ryan Reynolds plays... More »
  

Sundance 2016 Review: THE FITS, Or Maybe All Girls Are Magic

What makes a black girl fly? Is it her magic-- the frightful inheritance of her sex? Or is it illusory? (the shape of their hips in blue and gold sequins...) What makes a black girl fly? Is it her fear... More »
  

Slamdance 2016 Review: EMBERS, Fresh And Fascinating Sci-Fi

When we talk about ourselves we are building the conversation off a varied, often strange and impressionistic collection of moments stored over the culminating years of our lives. When we talk about ourselves, we talk about our memories. The time... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2016 Review: DARK NIGHT, Scenes From The New American Apocalypse

Close your eyes. Picture the scenes:

You gotta keep your head down. She runs hers hands through your hair; it must feel like walking barefoot on freshly cut grass, it's so short. The burnt orange dye bleeds into your scalp. You... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2016 Review: NEWTOWN, A Simple Tale Of Universal Grief

The horror of what took place on December 14, 2012 at Sandy Hook elementary school captured the world's attention. A young man, armed with an assault rifle, handgun and plenty of ammunition, walked through his old school and butchered... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Slamdance 2016 Review: DRIFTWOOD, On The Strange Life Of Objects

Against the onslaught of the crashing surf we arise into a world of soft, foaming white. From a distance, we can make out an approaching figure. Soon we see it's a she, a young woman, soaked to the bone, shivering... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2016 Review: CHRISTINE, A Report On The Art Of Self-Destruction

Performance>Perfection>Breakdown.

No. That's not right. Run the film again. What do we see: A woman in her late twenties, dark hair, big eyes, tall; walking down the halls of a TV station. Take the splicer to the footage. Chop it in... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2016 Review: OPERATION AVALANCHE, For The Love Of Cinema

There is a lure to the film camera that is almost primal. It draws you in, ever closer, a potent combo of machine and magic. Pressed against your ear, your cheek, the click-whir miracle of celluloid is god calling you... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Slamdance 2016 Review: MAD Finds The Humor In Sadness

Robert G. Putka has built up a smart and sharp filmography of shorts over the last half decade, emphasizing rich, rude and raw performances, deriving his drama and comedy with character first. MAD, his feature debut, is as charming as... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: DIABLO, A Western That Makes Its Genre Generic

The Western film genre, a main staple of American movies decades ago, but nowadays much scarcer, is currently enjoying a mini-revival, spearheaded by the current 70mm roadshow release of Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight, in which Tarantino continues to marry... More »
  

Review: MACBETH, Injected With Dread And Cool

Justin Kurzel's Snowtown was a remarkable film, a brash feature debut that signaled the emergence of a unique talent joining a slew of them coming out of the Australian independent scene. Following up a powerful true crime story with... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: IN THE HEART OF THE SEA, Old-Fashioned In The Best Possible Way

Billed as the story that inspired Moby Dick, Ron Howard's adaptation of Nathaniel Philbrick's National Book Award winner is a shamelessly old-fashioned sea-faring yarn recounting the true story of the Essex, a Nantucket whaleship that sank after being attacked by... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: THE AUTOMATIC HATE, Blood Is Not Thicker Than Water

Not all families are good or well-adjusted; there are often rifts (reasonable or not) between parents and children, siblings, cousins. Some of us might find out about skeletons in a closet, and sometimes those skeletons are best left undisturbed. In Justin... More »
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: MA, A Mesmerizing Study In Movement And Myth

Celia Rowlson-Hall studied choreography and dance, but has turned her considerable talents in those areas to film and video, and her first feature-length film Ma is a experimental wonder, a strange retelling of the Virgin Mary, which becomes a pilgrimage... More »
  

Black Nights 2015 Review: GRANDMA, Lily Tomlin At Her Finest

Lily Tomlin is having a renaissance, and we should all be thankful for that. A consummate performer and comedian, she has aged not only gracefully, but in strength as an actor. And her skills are on full display in Grandma.... More »
  

Short Film, Short Review: The Backwoods Collide In NEVER TEAR US APART

Two young men have driven out to a remote house in the woods. One thinks it is quaint and idyllic. Are these guys lost? Are they at the right cabin? One of them walks up to the window and what... More »
By Andrew Mack   
  

Toronto After Dark 2015 Review: PATCHWORK's Combo Of Laughs And Gore Will Leave You In Stitches

Jennifer, Ellie and Madeleine could not be more different from each other. Jennifer is a professional businesswoman ready to celebrate her birthday and closing a big deal at work. Ellie is a party girl looking for a good time. And... More »
By Andrew Mack   
  

Toronto After Dark 2015 Review: THE HEXECUTIONERS, Welcome To The Job From Hell

Sanctioned euthanasia is a full blown industry and Malison is just starting to get her feet wet at her new job. After a rough start she is paired up with seasoned veteran Olivia and together they head out to the... More »
By Andrew Mack   
  

Toronto After Dark 2015 Review: THE HOLLOW ONE Demonstrates More Depth Than Its Title Lets On

Rachel Wade left the family farm two years ago for the big city after a tragic accident took the life of her mother. Now living in downtown Seattle the disappearance of her father compels her to return and face her... More »
By Andrew Mack   
  

Toronto After Dark 2015 Review: THE DIABOLICAL Covers The Basics Of Haunted Houses With A Hint Of Sci-Fi

Let us jump right into The Diabolical, because that is what writer/director Alistair Legrand and writing partner Luke Harvis do. Right off the hop we meet Ali Later as Madison, a single mom who is trying to hold on to... More »
By Andrew Mack   
  
 
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