Internationl Reviews - Foreign, Overseas

Rooftop Films 2016 Review: "This is What We Mean By Short Films," A Wealth of Miniature Gems

Rooftop Films Summer Series 2016 got off to a great start with their opening night presentation, “This is What We Mean By Short Films,” an eclectic and incredibly accomplished selection of shorts, some of which had their New York premieres... More »
  

Tribeca 2016 Review: ALWAYS SHINE, In Which The Hollywood Dream Factory Becomes A Nightmare

Director Sophia Takal more than fulfills the considerable promise of her debut Green with her second feature, a film that often looks, acts and feels like a thriller/horror flick, but at its heart is a dramatic treatise on the tyranny... More »
  

Review: I AM THALENTE Skates With Soul

We all know the sound. That clack-scrape-whoosh of a skateboard on the sidewalk. For many of us it is as close to the sport as we get. When we hear that sound most of us move out of the way... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: LAST DAYS IN THE DESERT, A Wandering Christ Parable

Director Rodrigo García's minimalist Christ-centered parable on fathers and sons pivots the holy man as everyman and observer. It's an approach that feels of merit: one that ultimately doesn't see earth-bound humanity and a more intangible sense of spirituality as... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Tribeca 2016 Review: ALWAYS SHINE, In Which the Hollywood Dream Factory Becomes A Nightmare

Director Sophia Takal more than fulfills the considerable promise of her debut Green with her second feature, a film that often looks, acts and feels like a thriller/horror flick, but at its heart is a dramatic treatise on the tyranny... More »
  

Review: HERE ALONE, Having Loved And Lost In Time Of The Apocalypse

Two of the most mis-quoted lines in Lord Tennyson’s poem ‘In Memoriam’ are… 'Tis better to have loved and lost Than never to have loved at all. These lines are often taken out of their context (the author’s mourning the... More »
By Andrew Mack   
  

Hot Docs 2016 Review: HOW TO BUILD A TIME MACHINE Beautifully Mixes Craft And Emotion

The famous Serenity Prayer of american theologian Reinhold Niebuhr is as follows:  "God grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change, the courage to change the things I can, and the wisdom to know the difference." Jay... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Review: PALI ROAD, An Intriguing Thriller That Doesn't Quite Go The Distance

Pali Road, the romantic mystery thriller directed by Jonathan Lim, derives its title from an actual road on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, where the film is set. This road is said to be haunted, with many mysterious and unexplainable... More »
  

Review: SACRIFICE Treads Familiar Ground

Bodies of mutilated women, children in peril, distraught mothers and mysterious sects are ripe fodder for horror films, and are tropes that writer and directors return to frequently. As such, with this ground being tred frequently, it's hard to come... More »
  

Review: THE DRIFTLESS AREA, A Metaphysical Marvel

We humans often like to think of ourselves as creatures of habit. It helps to compartmentalize our world, making order out of chaos. As someone who operates quite often from his head, habits are important. Writing movie reviews, attempting to... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Tribeca 2016 Review: KICKS, Announcing An Exciting New Talent

Kicks, a film about a hapless teenager who finds himself launched into the Bay Area's violent underbelly after being jumped for his new sneakers, bristles with immediacy, excitement and urgency. It's a remarkably assured, confident movie for a debut feature... More »
By Teresa Nieman   
  

Dallas 2016 Review: DAYLIGHT'S END, An Action-Packed Post-Apocalyptic Thriller

One of my favorite films of 2010 was William Kaufman's Sinners & Saints, a low-budget thriller with a great leading man (Johnny Strong) and brilliant action scenes. This year, Kaufman and Strong have teamed up for another movie called Daylight’s... More »
By Hugo Ozman   
  

Review: PHANTOM HALO Never Quite Decides What It Wants To Be

Antonia Bogdanovich's feature debut Phantom Halo can never quite figure out which direction to head in. Part family drama, part crime thriller, these two ideas are not necessarily antithetical, and each in and of themselves is not necessarily bad (though... More »
  

Review: VALLEY OF LOVE, An Affecting Ghost Story Set In Death Valley

It strikes me as peculiar that Gerard Depardieu and Isabelle Huppert, two of the French cinema's titans, each appearing in hundreds of films (Depardieu 217 films, Huppert 126 to date according to imdb), had previously worked together in just 2... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: BATMAN V SUPERMAN: DAWN OF JUSTICE, Overburdened By Expectation And Obligation

DC Comics kick-starts its expanded cinematic universe by pitting its two greatest superheroes against one another in Zack Snyder’s hugely anticipated follow-up to 2013’s Man Of Steel.   With the Nolan/Bale Dark Knight trilogy looming large in the background, Ben... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: HYENA ROAD Straddles A Blurred Line

Hyena Road is a bit of a difficult film to quantify. On the one hand, it follows perhaps a bit too closely to some cliched images and story formats of soldiers at war. On the other, it has an earnestness... More »
  

Review: Tonko House Returns With Super Cute MOOM

Today Tonko House's latest creation, called Moom, is having its world premiere at Cinequest Film Festival. In 2014, after leaving the safety of the Pixar nest to start their own studio Tonko House, directors Daisuke "Dice" Tsutsumi and Robert Kondo... More »
  

Review: LONDON HAS FALLEN, Rocking The Free World With Dubious Politics And Sadistic Tendencies

Gerard Butler finds himself taking up arms to save Aaron Eckhart’s US President once again in this expanded sequel to Antoine Fuqua’s Olympus Has Fallen. Trading the claustrophobic confines of the White House for the deserted streets of Britain’s terrorised... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: CROUCHING TIGER, HIDDEN DRAGON: SWORD OF DESTINY Should Have Stayed Hidden

In regards to this Netflix original, setting the bar impossibly low barely helped tolerate the arduous two-part viewing experience of this martial-arts mess. Sullying Ang Lee’s beautiful vision of the vintage source material, Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon: Sword of Destiny... More »
  

Review: JACK OF THE RED HEARTS Means Well, But Falls Flat

It's not easy to make a film about a particular issue prevelant in society - be it an illness, a social problem, a political situation - and make it dramatically interesting. This is especially true if the issue is one... More »
  
 
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