Internationl Reviews - Foreign, Overseas

Rooftop Films 2016 Review: "This is What We Mean By Short Films," A Wealth of Miniature Gems

Rooftop Films Summer Series 2016 got off to a great start with their opening night presentation, “This is What We Mean By Short Films,” an eclectic and incredibly accomplished selection of shorts, some of which had their New York premieres... More »
  

Review: CHEVALIER, Men In Competition

Greek director Athina Rachel Tsangari is seen as an important part of the current Greek "Weird Wave" of cinema. She produced several of Yorgos Lanthimos' films like Dogtooth, and he helped produce (and acted in) her previous film Attenberg. But... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: THE ONES BELOW, Beware The Kindness Of Neighbors

Properly moody, The Ones Below brews up a strong cup of neighborly paranoia. It's a familiar story. Kate (Clémence Poésy) and Justin (Stephen Campbell Moore) live in a lovely flat in a lovely building in a lovely London suburb. Kate... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Cannes 2016 Review: ELLE, A Sordid, Provocative Masterwork

Paul Verhoeven is one of the more unique directors in cinema history. As perhaps the most famous Dutch auteur, he's gone from ribald little European films to the biggest of Hollywood bangs, incorporating his unique wit, visual sense and narrative... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Out Now On Blu-ray: A LETTER TO MOMO Looks Neat And Crisp

To say that we're fans of Okiura Hiroyuki is an understatement, to say we wish he'd make more films even more so. While his hands have been all over some of anime's best known classics, and his career includes working... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: Pawan Kumar's U TURN Will Keep You Guessing Until The Last Minute

Indian director Pawan Kumar is one of the most interesting and uncomprimising talents in South Asia today. His last film, Lucia, was the first crowd funded feature to appear from India and its trippy story about the effects of a... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Cannes 2016 Review: GRADUATION Fails To Engage

Cristian Mungiu's film Four Months, Three Weeks, 2 Days heralded the Romanian New Wave when it won the Palme d'Or at Cannes in 2007. His other features have since played at the festival, and his latest, Graduation, is in competition,... More »
  

Cannes 2016 Review: THE NEON DEMON, A Dark, Seductive Symphony

If beauty is fleeting, is there anything more precious than protecting it while it lasts? If all you have going for yourself is the outer shell, to what lengths would you go to in order to keep your specialness? Does... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2016 Review: THE RED TURTLE Sublimely Tugs Our Strings

Human emotions can be fragile, unpredictable things. However, they can sometimes also be pretty damned predictable. Show someone a kitten and they'll feel an emotional pang. Show a human going through the stages of life from youth to life's logical... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Review: KAILI BLUES, The Most Impressive Debut In Years

A country doctor's search for his nephew becomes an unforgettable existential road trip in Kaili Blues, directed by a 26-year old Chinese filmmaker, Bi Gan. It's an ambitious, mesmerizing film that you'd never think it is the work of a first... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: MARGARITA WITH A STRAW, Masterfully Directed And Extremely Clever

Premiering in 2014 at the Toronto International Film Festival, Margarita With A Straw received standing ovations at each of its three sold-out screenings, and it is not hard to understand why.  Dismissing any cliché or heavy handed sentiments, director Shonali... More »
  

NY Indian Film Fest 2016 Review: KHOYA, A Drama About Displacement, Loss, And The Dangerous Nature Of Truth

Being a film writer has its ups and downs. We are constantly inundated by wannabe filmmakers looking to make their mark on the world. Like any other aspirational pursuit, the vast majority of the output from these cold calls is... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

NY Indian Film Fest 2016 Review: CRIME IS PUNISHMENT, The Tamil New Wave Rolls On

M. Manikandan is one of a small group of filmmakers from Tamil Nadu who are a hair's breath away from making a huge international splash. Two years ago his film Kaaka Muttai (The Crow's Egg) wowed Toronto IFF audiences with... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Cannes 2016 Review: JULIETA, Beauty Without Substance

Alfred Hitchcock once said, 'Drama is life with the dull bits cut out'. To twist that a bit, Pedro Almodóvar's new feature film Julieta is a slice of life with the drama cut out. The story of one woman's journey... More »
  

Cannes 2016 Review: RAW, A Terrifying and Gripping Evisceration

It's hard to maintain one's identity when university begins; or perhaps more to the point, find your identity under enormous pressure to do well in school, adapt to life without constant parental supervision, not to mentions the pressures of the... More »
  

Cannes 2016 Review: THE HANDMAIDEN, A Breathtaking And Twisted Lesbian Thriller

Following his Hollywood foray Stoker, Park Chan-wook returns to (mostly) home soil for his sumptuous and sensual adaptation of Sarah Waters' Fingersmith. Transposing the novel's setting from Victorian England to 1930s Korea and Japan, when the former was a colony... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Cannes 2016 Review: TRAIN TO BUSAN, A Zombie Thrillride With Social Bite

For his live-action debut Train to Busan, indie animation director Yeon Sang-ho, whose films The King of Pigs and The Fake have drawn international acclaim, has taken the zombie thriller, stuck it into the claustrophobic confines of a train, and... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: KILL ZONE 2, A Delirious, Masterfully Staged Martial Arts Melodrama

Never fear the “2” in the title of Soi Cheang’s deliriously baroque, thrillingly action-packed extravaganza Kill Zone 2, better known in Asia (and to early film festival viewers) as SPL 2: A Time for Consequences.   This is a follow-up,... More »
  

Tribeca 2016 Review: ALWAYS SHINE, In Which The Hollywood Dream Factory Becomes A Nightmare

Director Sophia Takal more than fulfills the considerable promise of her debut Green with her second feature, a film that often looks, acts and feels like a thriller/horror flick, but at its heart is a dramatic treatise on the tyranny... More »
  

Review: FYNBOS, Brilliantly Anti-Cathartic Cinema

A young white woman in high heels walks down a street in a black working-class neighborhood. Though clearly on edge, she walks with a purpose. She pauses at a row of trash cans. Clothes billow in the wind, threaded on... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  
 
  Next »
Page 1 of 295