Review: SEVENTH SON, Generic And Self-Serious Fantasy Fare

A bad spell seems to have been cast on Seventh Son. Sergei Bodrov's first American feature - to whom we owe the impressive 2007's Mongol - saw its release indefinitely delayed. Originally slated to hit US theaters on February 2013,... More »
  

Review: LOCAL GOD, Surreal Horror Of The Creative Process

In his first feature film The Silent House, director Gustavo Hernández told a familiar haunted house story in a unfamiliar way, by shooting it in a single take. For his second feature, Local God, he again approaches a familiar... More »
  

Review: Rajkumar Hirani's PK Ticks All The Right Bollywood Boxes

It's been five years since Bollywood blockbuster specialist Rajkumar Hirani destroyed box office records and made international waves with 3 Idiots. That film, with the help of an endearing lead performance from 40 something Aamir Khan as a college student,... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: NATURAL DISASTERS (Desastres Naturales), A Funny Political Film About Students And Teachers

It's not usual to find a director under the age of 25 who actually promises not only a style but also an attitude towards the filmmaking space that he inhabits. That is the case of Chilean director Bernardo Quesney, who with... More »
  

Review: MR. TURNER, A Film That Loses Its Focus

Mike Leigh's latest offering lustfully tackles the life, work and loves of Joseph Mallord William Turner, the legendary 19th Century British artist whose landscape paintings are revered around the world. Mr. Turner is a carefully constructed film, part performance piece... More »
  

Book Review: BE SAND, NOT OIL - THE LIFE AND WORK OF AMOS VOGEL Or The Almost Lost Subversion In Cinema

When people attain a fascination with the medium of film they rarely choose a career in education. More often they become filmmakers, film critics (which is or at least should be some kind of education) and most often (like all... More »
  

Review: CHILDREN, A Lyrical Look At Patrimonial Relationships And Moral Crises

After Juraj Lehotský´s recent Miracle, Jaro Vojtek, another Slovak documentarian, has turned to fiction territory, debuting with the gently titled film Children. Vojtek is no stranger to the domestic audience. He rose to prominence with the documentary Here We Are... More »
  

Review: Superstar Rajini's LINGAA, For Super Fans Only

At this point in his career, Rajnikanth is more than simply a performer, he is an icon. The highest paid actor in South Asia, Rajini films draw fanatical crowds not only in Tamil Nadu, but around the world. So much... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Blu-ray Review: KILL LA KILL Kicks Ass And Has A UK Boxset

(For those with a sailor-suit fetish and/or a certain sense of humor, Christmas sure has arrived early...) Confession time: when the first trailer and images of the anime series Kill La Kill appeared on the Internet last year, I thought... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Mórbido Mérida 2014 Review: JIRON, How A Movie By A Major Filmmaker Disappeared

Full disclosure: I was completely ignorant of Mexican filmmaker Carlos Enrique Taboada before watching this movie. Thus, Jirón (Shred), a new documentary by Christian Cueva, proved to be educational, fascinating, and compelling, not only because it explores the disappearance of... More »
  

Japan Film Festival 2014 Review: TOKYO REFUGEES Clumsily Critiques Contemporary Japan

Director Kiyoshi Sasabe (My SO Has Depression) is no stranger to dark narratives, and his latest, Tokyo Refugees, could be his darkest yet. Based on the many seedy and sad things you may have heard about Tokyo, the film aims to... More »
  

Japan Film Festival 2014 Review: RUROUNI KENSHIN: THE LEGEND ENDS Caps An Explosive Trilogy

By this stage, the humble tale of the first film and the bombastic masterfully shot darkness of the second film should prepare you for what is in store in Rurouni Kenshin: The Legend Ends. Namely, a lot of exposition, happenstance... More »
  

Review: ODE TO MY FATHER Puts Blockbuster Spin On Melodrama

Family takes centre stage in Ode to My Father, a new Korean melodrama that is every bit as bombastic as this year's naval battle hit Roaring Currents. Directed by JK Youn (Youn Je-kyun), whose last film Haeundae sauntered over the... More »
  

Review: EXODUS: GODS AND KINGS Is Lost In The Wilderness

Meeting, but rarely exceeding, expectations, Ridley Scott's grand retelling of Moses and the Hebrews' flight from Egypt is strong on visuals and A-list presence, but slight on narrative and characterisation. Christian Bale and Joel Egerton both put in fine performances... More »
  

Japan Film Festival 2014 Review: LADY MAIKO Is A Languidly Lyrical Linguistic Lark

A loose remake of the hit 1964 Broadway musical My Fair Lady, Lady Maiko (also a musical) takes the basic premise of genteel sensibility and applies it to the contemporary realm of traditional Kyoto geisha and maiko (those in... More »
  

Review: ZERO MOTIVATION Is A Sharply Observed Military Comedy

Stationed in the middle of dusty nowhere, the girls of the administration hub in an Israeli military post spend their time making coffees for the senior officers and doing boring office duties day in and day out. It's far from... More »
  

Review: WOMEN WHO FLIRT Sees Pang Score North Of The Border

After dipping his toe into China with his 2012 sequel Love In The Buff, Hong Kong auteur Pang Ho Cheung embraces the inevitable and presents his first full-blown mainland production, Women Who Flirt. Zhou Xun and Huang Xiaoming play the... More »
  

Review: THE BABADOOK Plays Havoc With The Ideals Of Family Life

Australian writer-director Jennifer Kent makes a promising debut with The Babadook, a dramatic horror film that plays havoc with the ideals of family life and the love of a mother for her child. Amelia has not had it easy. Once... More »
By Todd Brown   
  

Review: THE IMITATION GAME Cannot Live Up To Its Inherent Drama

From a British nation that has had its fair share of scientific geniuses, it's perhaps no surprise that the life and work of Alan Turing has spawned its fair share of dramatic works. There have been TV versions, drama/docs, and... More »
  

Five Flavours 2014 Review: SHADOW DAYS, A Bold Critique Of China's Notorious One-Child Policy

Zhao Dayong's meaningful and compelling drama Shadow Days offers an unflinching commentary on pressing social and cultural issues pertinent to contemporary China. The documentary maker's second foray into fiction, it revolves around an ordinary young couple who move into an... More »
  
 
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