Internationl Reviews - Foreign, Overseas

Sidewalk Film Fest 2015 Review: THREE FINGERS, A Powerful Engagement With Trauma

While the average person in the United States might be familiar with the illness known as post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and its prevalence among war veterans, it is arguably an 'invisible' illness (unlike the loss of a limb, for example)... More »
  

Review: NO ESCAPE Shows Us The Asia That Americans Should Be Afraid Of

Asia is terrifying. With its obscure languages, stifling humidity, tropical foliage, peculiar deities, dubious military regimes, weird food and proximity to historically hazardous war zones, American citizens would be insane to go near any part of it. The only Westerners... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: TURBO KID, Made With The Right Kind Of Secret Ingredient

(Gory equals glory with lots of guts!) Saying Turbo Kid is Mad Max on BMX-bikes may be a quick description, and not exactly misleading, but it's also selling the film a bit short. For starters it fails to show Turbo... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: SHE'S FUNNY THAT WAY Puts The Fun In Funny

Peter Bogdanovich's screwball sensibilities thankfully do not get the better of him in the absurd and kinetic She's Funny That Way. The film follows the various dramas, loves and lusts of the players of a theater production in New... More »
  

Blu-ray Review: ELFEN LIED Bares Bodies And Souls

(... and often also the insides of both...) British distributor 101 Films seems to own exactly two anime licenses, and it released one of those a few weeks ago on Blu-ray, in a beautiful shiny steelbook (seen here). I'm... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Blu-ray Review: BIG GAME's Unrated Version Has A Better 'Finnish'

Jalmari Helander's action flick Big Game will hit Blu-ray today. We have had a look at the Blu-ray release which may be sparse in added features but the sole feature, an Unrated Version with an extra five minutes of footage,... More »
By Andrew Mack   
  

Blu-ray Review: A BLADE IN THE DARK, From 88 Films

Director Lamberto Bava is probably most famous for being the son of legendary Italian director Mario Bava. The elder Bava is one of those filmmakers whose work is ubiquitous among hardcore horror fans, but his reach beyond that is minimal. Nevertheless,... More »
By Charlie Hobbs   
  

Review: See A Moving Biosphere in J.P. Sniadecki's THE IRON MINISTRY

Just like Leviathan and Manakamana before it, J.P. Sniadecki's The Iron Ministry is another striking sensory cinema experience. Closely associated with Havard Sensory Ethnography Lab and its esteemed Colleagues - Julien Castraing-Taylor, Verena Paravel, Stephanie Spray, Pacho Velez and others, ... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: JOURNEY TO ROME, Imaginary Embroidery Reigns Over Spiritual Comedy

One of the most common mistakes of filmmaking neophytes is an adamant effort to ram a wagon of ideas into their first outing even at the cost of crippling the final result. The credo, 'I am doing a big film... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Review: BROTHERS, A Brawler Submits To Bollywood Bloat

Gavin O'Connor's Warrior was a surprise critical and box office hit back in 2011, as well as being one of the first studio films set within the increasingly popular world of Mixed Martial Arts fighting. That film pitted brothers Tom... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: CHARLIE'S COUNTRY Enthralls

When I saw Rolf de Heer's Bad Boy Bubby in an arthouse theatre back in the mid-90s, I was totally unprepared for such raw and nihilistic filmmaking. A violent and dark film, it was clear from that one film that... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: THE GREEDY TIFFANY, A Feat In Czech Genre Production

Genre production does not really thrive in Czech Republic. The contrary seems to be the case, and it appears to be rather an endangered species. This year saw the release of two horror films of the same breed (found footage). While... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Locarno 2015 Review: RIGHT NOW, WRONG THEN, Stars Shine In Classic Hong Sangsoo

Following Hong Sangsoo's career guarantees for viewers, at the very least, one thing - developing a keen eye for detail. The auteur's films are remarkably similar to one another, from their lecherous male director/professor characters and conversations over bottles of... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: PRINCE, Innocence Triumphs Over Thug Life

Young Dutch filmmaker Sam de Jong's debut film Prince has all the stereotypical elements that make up a so-called gangsta movie: guns, drugs, babes, bling-blings and expensive sports mobiles. But underneath all its macho posturing, inner-city working class clichés and... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: THE GLASS MAN, A Frightening Spiral Into A Personal Hell

The most uncomfortable subject is not sex; it is money. Not in political discussions, but personal ones. We don't ask people how much money they make; we don't ask them about their personal finances. It is probably safe to assume... More »
  

Lima 2015 Review: THE FIRE (EN INCENDIO) Consumes A Relationship And Makes You Watch

Brutal and horrifying are words you'd normally use to describe a horror movie, not a relationship drama, but The Fire (El Incendio), from first-time director Juan Schnitman, earns them. It has nothing to do with ghosts or monsters, but it's... More »
  

Review: WE COME AS FRIENDS, Shadows Of Colonial Past Still Loom Over South Sudan

Hubert Sauper, a Paris based filmmaker known for his searing eco-disaster exposé in Tanzania, Darwin's Nightmare (2005), continues to document the African continent in his new documentary, We Come As Friends. This time, he sheds light on the post-referendum era... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Lima 2015 Review: DOS BESOS, A Melodrama With Some Surprises

Peruvian director Francisco J. Lombardi has worked steadily since the late 70s, having made 18 films; not a small feat in a country where making movies is a difficult task. The Lima Film Festival is one of the longest running... More »
  

Review: THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. Targets Style Over Spying

For its big screen reboot of the classic 60s spy series, Warner Brothers is hoping Guy Ritchie can replicate the success of their earlier Sherlock Holmes adaptations, again favouring witty banter and period detail over the material's more action-oriented elements.... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON, An Artful And Entertaining Musical Biopic

"You are now about to witness the strength of street knowledge." So begins the title track of NWA's seminal 1988 album Straight Outta Compton, a hip-hop landmark that almost single-handedly changed the direction of the art form. The making of... More »
  
 
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