Review: ROOT (RAIZ) Is Somewhat Literal In Its Symbology

The winner of the Chilean Competition in last year's Valdivia Film Festival, Raíz (Root) managed not only to get chosen to participate in many festivals from Latin America and beyond, but also snagged a Chilean distribution deal, something that doesn't... More »
  

Lima 2014 Review: VIEJOS AMIGOS, A Light, Harmless Comedy About Growing Old

The debut film from director Fernando Villarán, Viejos Amigos is one of the most anticipated local films of the year. For some odd reason, its theatrical run has kicked off on the same week it plays at the Lima Film Festival, which just... More »
  

Review: WE ARE MARI PEPA (SOMOS MARI PEPA), An Honest Portrait Of Youth With A Dose Of Punk Rock

Mari Pepa is the name of a punk rock band in We Are Mari Pepa (Somos Mari Pepa), Samuel Isamu Kishi Leopo's extension of his own 18-minute short film Mari Pepa. "Mari" refers to marihuana, while "pepa" is slang for... More »
  

Review: DARKER THAN NIGHT (MÁS NEGRO QUE LA NOCHE), An Embarrassingly Bad 3D Remake

The original Más Negro Que la Noche, or Darker Than Night, was written and directed by the late Carlos Enrique Taboada in 1975. Widely considered as one of the most important Mexican horror films ever made, it is everything this... More »
  

Lima 2014 Review: Revenge Is A Dish Best Served Differently In TO KILL A MAN

Jorge (Daniel Candia) is a meek, introverted park ranger who spends most of his day alone in the forest. On the way home one night, he runs into a group of thugs led by the neighborhood bully, Kalule (Daniel Antivilo),... More »
  

Lima 2014 Review: REFUGIADO, A Truthful Account Of The Impact Of Domestic Abuse

No topic is taboo when it comes to movies, but some of them do require care. If certain subjects are not handled correctly, filmmakers can be accused of being exploitative and/or insensitive. It takes a deft directorial hand successfully work... More »
  

Review: HEIGHTS (CUMBRES), A Subtle Character Piece Inspired By The Killer Of Cumbres Case

Inspired by a real life high-profile crime that happened in Monterrey, Mexico, Heights (Cumbres) is a film that in the wrong hands could have been a disaster, close to the sensationalist journalism that covered said case back in 2006. However,... More »
  

Lima 2014 Review: GUEROS Takes You On A Ride Through Mexico City

Gueros, the debut film from director Alonso Ruiz Palacios, begins on a high note: a stylish, energetic opening detailing the inevitable collision between a woman carrying her baby on a stroller and a badly timed water balloon. This little act... More »
  

Review: THE MAGNETIC TREE Attracts, But Fails To Surprise

This Spanish-Chilean co-production was among the most lauded of the Valdivia Film Festival last year. Though it failed to win any official festival prizes, The Magnetic Tree (El árbol magnético) was easily one of the most spoken-about movies. It managed... More »
  

FIDOCS 2014 Review: THE WALTZ OF THE USELESS Is An Accurate Chronicle That Lacks Focus

Personally, I think that the sign of a good documentary is when it sets out to "document" something and lays out the facts in the ground in a clear and proper fashion, either it be through interviews, narrations, or whatever... More »
  

FIDOCS 2014 Review: TIMOTEO'S FABULOUS RAGGED CIRCUS, A True Crowd Pleaser

FIDOCS (Festival Internacional Documentales Santiago Chile) has always been a showcase of the best documentary output that the world has to offer. At the same time it has managed to always choose the best documentaries that will have Chile talk for... More »
  

FIDOCS 2014 Review: PROPAGANDA Is Ultimately Universal

FIDOCS is one of the most important film festivals in Chile, as it's maybe one of the finest venues for documentaries from Chile and the world to be featured and seen in one week. Propaganda is a difficult film, due... More »
  

Review: HELI, Important And Unforgettable, Yet Still Taking The Easy Way Out

In Mexico there has been a lot of buzz surrounding Amat Escalante's third feature Heli. Yes, Steven Spielberg loved it at Cannes and Danny Boyle praised it at the Guanajuato Film Festival, but there's a large group of Mexican critics... More »
  

Review: I HATE LOVE Loves The Rom-Com Formula

Debuting internationally in 2012, but only now arriving in Mexican movie theaters, I Hate Love (Odio el Amor) tries too hard to be a distinctive effort in the romantic comedy field. It brings a mixed cast, with both Mexicans and Americans,... More »
  

Distrital 2014 Review: THE HAMSTERS Defines A Dysfunctional Family

The Hamsters (Los Hámsters) is the thesis film of CCC student Gilberto González Penilla. Right from the beginning, you understand what the director is trying to achieve with it, as he makes you look at an average Mexican family during... More »
  

Cannes 2014 Review: THE INCIDENT (EL INCIDENTE) Is One Of The Most Intriguing Mexican Films Of The Year

In what it feels like the scene with the most personal dialog during the first half of Isaac Ezban's The Incident (El Incidente), the agonizing character of Amores Perros' Humberto Busto shares his thoughts about life in general. "Life is... More »
  

Fantaspoa 2014 Review: RABBIT WOMAN (MUJER CONEJO) Is Part Thriller, Part B-Movie, And Always Pretty Damn Good

Ana Yang is the name of the lead character in Rabbit Woman (Mujer Conejo), a live-action film from Argentina that features some animated sequences as well. The name of its director is Veronica Chen, so we can indeed deduce the... More »
  

Review: LAS ANALFABETAS (Illiterate), A Filmed Play That Remains Stage-Bound

Paulina García has become one of the most recognizable faces in Chilean cinema around the world, especially after starring in Gloria, which had a successful festival and theatrical run in 2013 and 2014. Now she is the protagonist of this new... More »
  

Fantaspoa 2014 Review: DARKNESS BY DAY (EL DÍA TRAJO LA OSCURIDAD), Solid Atmospheric Horror From Argentina

The countryside of Argentina is the setting for Martín Desalvo's Darkness by Day (El Día Trajo la Oscuridad), a little horror film that rests almost entirely on its two main actresses, Mora Recalde and Romina Paula. They play Virginia and Anabel,... More »
  

Review: TANTA AGUA, A Fine Tuned Familial Comedy from Uruguay

Alberto (Néstor Guzzini), a schlubby divocé takes his two unenthused children, Lucia (Málu Chouza) and Federico (Joaquín Castiglioni) on a road trip from Montevideo to a famed hot spring. The problem is, when they get there, the pool is closed... More »
  
 
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