Review: MR. TURNER, A Film That Loses Its Focus

Mike Leigh's latest offering lustfully tackles the life, work and loves of Joseph Mallord William Turner, the legendary 19th Century British artist whose landscape paintings are revered around the world. Mr. Turner is a carefully constructed film, part performance piece... More »
  

Book Review: BE SAND, NOT OIL - THE LIFE AND WORK OF AMOS VOGEL Or The Almost Lost Subversion In Cinema

When people attain a fascination with the medium of film they rarely choose a career in education. More often they become filmmakers, film critics (which is or at least should be some kind of education) and most often (like all... More »
  

Review: CHILDREN, A Lyrical Look At Patrimonial Relationships And Moral Crises

After Juraj Lehotský´s recent Miracle, Jaro Vojtek, another Slovak documentarian, has turned to fiction territory, debuting with the gently titled film Children. Vojtek is no stranger to the domestic audience. He rose to prominence with the documentary Here We Are... More »
  

Blu-ray Review: KILL LA KILL Kicks Ass And Has A UK Boxset

(For those with a sailor-suit fetish and/or a certain sense of humor, Christmas sure has arrived early...) Confession time: when the first trailer and images of the anime series Kill La Kill appeared on the Internet last year, I thought... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: THE IMITATION GAME Cannot Live Up To Its Inherent Drama

From a British nation that has had its fair share of scientific geniuses, it's perhaps no surprise that the life and work of Alan Turing has spawned its fair share of dramatic works. There have been TV versions, drama/docs, and... More »
  

Review: NOWHERE IN MORAVIA, Czech Gothic Painted In Bleak Comedy

Czech actor, theatre director and chief of the theatre Dejvické Divadlo, Miroslav Krobot, possessing as diverse acting experience on top of the directing work as playing the lead in Bela Tarr´s The Man from London or having himself rotoscoped for the Alois... More »
  

Morbido Fest 2014 Review: FEED THE LIGHT, Beware The Sparkling Dust

Never separate a mother from her child. Sara is torn away from her daughter Jenny in the opening minutes of Feed the Light, a new film by Swedish director Henrik Möller that teeters between bad dreams and outright nightmares. Still... More »
  

Review: V/H/S VIRAL Delivers Another Mixed Bag Of Horror

V/H/S brought us stories from Ti West, Adam Wingard, Glen McQuaid, and Joe Swanberg, among others. V/H/S 2 gave us far superior films from Gareth Evans and Timo Tjahjanto, Gregg Hale and Eduardo Sanchez, Jason Eisener, Simon Barrett, and Adam... More »
  

Los Cabos 2014 Review: THULETUVALU Showcases The Consequences Of Global Warming

The documentary ThuleTuvalu is here to connect the Pacific Ocean island Tuvalu with the small town of Thule in northern Greenland. Never as visceral as the doc Leviathan, though still quite graphic, Matthias von Gunten's effort firstly exposes the world... More »
  

Lisbon & Estoril 2014 Review: Abel Ferrara's PASOLINI Hits Some, Misses Some

Abel Ferrara's take on Pier Paolo Pasolini's life (more than his career as a filmmaker, poet or philosopher) is the breed of biopic that seems modest and straightforward enough to make up for its obvious shortcomings. Its modesty comes from... More »
  

Review: OPEN WINDOWS Thrills And Chills

Early on in Open Windows, Spanish filmmaker Nacho Vigalondo invites easy comparisons to Alfred Hitchcock's Rear Window, but then, pardon the expression, he throws them out the window. What begins as an homage quickly morphs into a thriller with its... More »
  

Review: DOCTOR WHO S8E10, IN THE FOREST OF THE NIGHT (Or, London's Overgrown)

We rarely see the Doctor as ineffective as he is here, floundering and lacking plans or ideas in the aftermath of the entire world being transformed into an enormous forest. "In the Forest of the Night" is, for the most part,... More »
  

DVD Review: SOULMATE Offers Plenty Of Creepy Atmosphere

Axelle Carolyn's Soulmate is the kind of film that will inspire all sorts of reviews based upon a critics particular dispensation. Not scary enough to be a thriller, not bloody enough for gorehounds, and not paced quickly enough for those... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

New York 2014 Review: CITIZENFOUR, The Chilling Story Behind Edward Snowden's Explosive Revelations

In this year's New York Film Festival there were two gripping thrillers, both receiving their world premieres at the festival, and, intriguingly enough, both featuring moodily effective scores by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross. One was David Fincher's novel adaptation... More »
  

Warsaw 2014: NAME ME Zooms In On Abandoned Daughters

Nigina Sayfullaeva's feature debut Name Me opens with 17-year-old Olya collecting the courage to look her biological father in the eyes for the first time. To ease the melodramatic atmosphere, she is accompanied by her easygoing, overly self-confident and fun-seeking friend,... More »
  

Review: DOCTOR WHO S8E08, MUMMY ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS (Or, A Thoroughly Unpleasant Train Journey)

To its credit, Doctor Who doesn't attempt to sweep Clara's impassioned outburst from last week under the rug. Her eventual decision to continue travelling with the Doctor doesn't suggest she's forgotten why he made her so angry in the first... More »
  

Sitges 2014 Review: MAGICAL GIRL, Dark, Twisted Magic

Carlos Vermut's second feature Magical Girl recently won the Golden Shell at the a Sebastian Film Festival, as well as best director award, and deservedly so. Fun and disturbing, strange and yet somehow entirely plausible, the film tells the story of... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: Exorcising The Past in HORSE MONEY

Horse Money is astonishingly beautiful in its visual poetry! Pedro Costa, who wanted to capture the life in Lisbon's ghetto area called Fontainhas in the late 90s, made a beautiful film called Bones (Ossos). During the shoot, he saw much... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: In MISUNDERSTOOD, A Little Girl Contends With A Family From Hell

Leo Tolstoy famously opened his classic novel Anna Karenina with this statement: "Happy families are all alike. But all unhappy families are unhappy in their own way." You'd be hard pressed to find a family much unhappier than the one... More »
  

Review: DOCTOR WHO S8E07, Kill The Moon (Or, The Doctor Doesn't Decide)

Let's get straight to it. The idea that Doctor Who is weighing in with its thoughts on abortion and a woman's right to choose is surprising, to say the least. The episode uses the realisation that there's something going on... More »
  
 
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