Internationl Reviews - Foreign, Overseas

Rooftop Films 2016 Review: "This is What We Mean By Short Films," A Wealth of Miniature Gems

Rooftop Films Summer Series 2016 got off to a great start with their opening night presentation, “This is What We Mean By Short Films,” an eclectic and incredibly accomplished selection of shorts, some of which had their New York premieres... More »
  

Review: CHEVALIER, Men In Competition

Greek director Athina Rachel Tsangari is seen as an important part of the current Greek "Weird Wave" of cinema. She produced several of Yorgos Lanthimos' films like Dogtooth, and he helped produce (and acted in) her previous film Attenberg. But... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Cannes 2016 Review: GRADUATION Fails To Engage

Cristian Mungiu's film Four Months, Three Weeks, 2 Days heralded the Romanian New Wave when it won the Palme d'Or at Cannes in 2007. His other features have since played at the festival, and his latest, Graduation, is in competition,... More »
  

Cannes 2016 Review: THE RED TURTLE Sublimely Tugs Our Strings

Human emotions can be fragile, unpredictable things. However, they can sometimes also be pretty damned predictable. Show someone a kitten and they'll feel an emotional pang. Show a human going through the stages of life from youth to life's logical... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Cannes 2016 Review: JULIETA, Beauty Without Substance

Alfred Hitchcock once said, 'Drama is life with the dull bits cut out'. To twist that a bit, Pedro Almodóvar's new feature film Julieta is a slice of life with the drama cut out. The story of one woman's journey... More »
  

Cannes 2016 Review: RAW, A Terrifying and Gripping Evisceration

It's hard to maintain one's identity when university begins; or perhaps more to the point, find your identity under enormous pressure to do well in school, adapt to life without constant parental supervision, not to mentions the pressures of the... More »
  

Review: FYNBOS, Brilliantly Anti-Cathartic Cinema

A young white woman in high heels walks down a street in a black working-class neighborhood. Though clearly on edge, she walks with a purpose. She pauses at a row of trash cans. Clothes billow in the wind, threaded on... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: LAST DAYS IN THE DESERT, A Wandering Christ Parable

Director Rodrigo García's minimalist Christ-centered parable on fathers and sons pivots the holy man as everyman and observer. It's an approach that feels of merit: one that ultimately doesn't see earth-bound humanity and a more intangible sense of spirituality as... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: WHAT WE BECOME, The Noir-ish Horror Of A Family Being Torn Apart

An extremely well-made horror film from Denmark, What We Become (original title: Sorgenfri) examines the churning emotional dynamics of a nuclear family when they are placed under extreme -- some might even call it apocalyptic -- stress. Mother Pernille (Mille... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: THE LOBSTER Loses Its Way

Boy, I wanted to love this movie. Really, I did. I mean, the first shot of the film is a delight: a woman is passively driving in a car. She gets out, windshield wipers still flailing away, and pulls out... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: DHEEPAN, Behind The Immigrant Experience, A Rich And Provocative Story

It begins with chaos: shouting voices calling out in alarm, a cacophony of sound, and a flourish of a camera moving through a thick crowd. It ends with similar sounds and a similar shot, one far less sinister and disconcerting.... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Imagine 2016 Review: THEY CALL ME JEEG ROBOT Hits All Its Beats

(In short: it's like a sad Captain America versus a sad Joker, and it's great!) This year's winner of the audience award at the Imagine Film Festival Amsterdam came from an unexpected direction: Italy. While that country has a rich... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: RIO, I LOVE YOU, A Pretty But Unsatisfying Travel Package

Film franchises aren’t just for the multiplexes anymore, or for movies featuring the likes of Batman, Superman, and the Fast and the Furious road racing crew. The arthouse has them too, and one of the highest-profile ones is the “Cities... More »
  

Now On Blu-Ray: WHAT?, FELICITY, THAT'S SEXPLOITATION, & KUNG FU TRAILERS OF FURY From Severin Films

Severin Films has been very busy over the last several months delivering one stunner after another. In an effort to catch up on the deluge of quality releases, we're offering our opinions in a gallery of their most recent Blu-ray... More »
By Charlie Hobbs   
  

Hot Docs 2016 Review: BROTHERS Says A Lot About Parents

In Aslaug Holm's gorgeously shot documentary on her own children - make no mistake, this is no home movie, but a rigorous 16mm film production by a veteran filmmaker - a recurring image is laundry hanging out on the line... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Review: SING STREET Tunes Into 1980s Pop Music

“Any guy who says he started playing guitar for any other reason than meeting girls is lying.” That's not an exact quote, but it's the gist of what some rock star once said. I was thinking it was either John... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

GoEast 2016 Review: In Polish Anthology NEW WORLD, An Immigrant's Life Is A Dilemma-Ridden Conundrum

The year 2015 was a pretty turbulent and tough one for the Old Continent. It seems that Europe landed under the sign of nomad. The socio-ethnographic locomotion of the magnitude displayed in previous years and hastily ham-fisted decisions sprung from... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Review: MEN AND CHICKEN, The Ones We Love

Anders Thomas Jensen has reunited with long-time collaborator Mads Mikkelsen for Men And Chicken, an utterly strange, absurdist film that revels in Dr. Moreau-type conventions and the awkwardness of long-lost family, as well as the family that can seem more like... More »
  

Review: Joachim Trier's LOUDER THAN BOMBS Goes Off Gently, Beautifully

I can't stress enough that watching Joachim Trier's films is like reading really good books, that he might be the most literary (not in a superficial sense) film director working today. With each new film, Trier and his writing partner... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Criterion's BICYCLE THIEVES Steals The Show

Vittorio De Sica is widely regarded as a master in the realm of world cinema. As one of the Italian neorealism forerunners (in company with Roberto Rossellini and Luchino Visconti), De Sica concentrated on films that told stories about real... More »
  
 
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