Slamdance 2015 Review: CONCRETE LOVE, An Intimate, Immaculate Look At A Family Of Architects

We all wish to be immortalized in some way. To be remembered for something extraordinary or meaningful. Most of us will be remembered by the way we loved, who we loved and how we loved. It is what we do... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: POSTPARTUM. So, Speaking Of Six-Minute Emotional Roller Coasters

What a delightful 6 minutes. If by delightful I mean creepy as fuck. Which I do.When we're met at the door by a disheveled and demented blonde beauty with bloodstained hands and a batshiteatingcrazy grin, and a baby in the... More »
By Stuart Muller   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: H. Explores The Strange Dissonance Of Coupling

There's something strange in the waters of Troy, New York. Something life-changing in the skies. Some of us can see it, some of us can hear it. Some of us will wander into the woods to find it, leaving our... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: HELLIONS, A Monstrous Misstep

Hellions, Journeyman director Bruce McDonald's first foray into horror since 2008's slow-cooker Pontypool, is a maelstorm of horror traditions and tropes, good and bad alike. While the film is never boring for its constant barrage of evocative imagery, cacophonous score... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Slamdance 2015 Review: BIRDS OF NEPTUNE, Of Malady And Mysticism

Cinema has a way of acting like an echo chamber. it locks us into a space where we are asked to face up to ourselves through the guise of others: Our own doubts, and fears projected on the screen, looking... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: LAST DAYS IN THE DESERT And The Closeness Of The Great Divide

Director Rodrigo García's minimalist Christ-centered parable on fathers and sons pivots the holy man as everyman and observer. It's an approach that feels of merit: one that ultimately doesn't see earth-bound humanity and a more intangible sense of spirituality as... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: COP CAR, A Cult Classic Waiting To Happen

Sometimes a film's premise just sells itself. Two mischievous boys stumble upon an abandoned cop car and decide to take it for a joyride. It turns out the cop car belongs to an officer on the wrong side of the... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Rotterdam 2015 Review: In STINKING HEAVEN Everything Rotten Is Good

We all live by rules. Whether they are personal choices to undertake or those put upon us by work or family, we live by them. But sometimes those rules can destroy us.Nathan Silver's fifth feature, Stinking Heaven, takes place in... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: BEST OF ENEMIES, A Vital Showcase On Media Iconoclasts

In many ways my media consumption is the child of events that date back to 1968. As an avid consumer of "mainstream" news (CNN is my background music) I have a potentially unhealthy fascination with the way that Americans... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Slamdance 2015 Review: FEMALE PERVERT Cuts Cute With Gender Roles

Sex. We wouldn't be here without it. And we sure do like it. But who wants to talk about it? Especially all those particulars...Filmmaker Jiyoung Lee is ready to though, and her intelligent, equally charming and cheeky examination on female... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: THE WITCH Will Leave You Haunted And Impressed

Dark, brooding, and mysterious, The Witch is more parts drama than horror. But genre elements and a solid grounding in period source material will keep audiences engaged throughout the film's thrilling conclusion. Set in New England circa 1630 (well before... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Slamdance 2015 Review: RATTER, A New High Mark In Cyber-Suspense

Since the very beginning of the medium, cinema has been inextricably linked to voyeurism.For to see, we have to look. And sometimes that's in wrong or uncomfortable places. We are, as an audience -- at home, in the theater, sitting... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: Z FOR ZACHARIAH, A Deeply Affecting Near-Future Parable

The premise is beautiful in its elegant simplicity - a woman is left alone in a world that has befallen a catastrophe. Her solitude is interrupted when a man appears, unsettling her life and making radical changes to her... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Slamdance 2015 Review: TIRED MOONLIGHT, An Effervescent, Enchanting Debut

Britni West's debut feature is sure to be the most enchanting feature at this year's Slamdance. An ode to small town America, every moment in West's film is is one of effervescent discovery, culling childhood wonder and adult wanderlust with... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: TANGERINE Pops With Verve And Vérité

On the streets of Los Angeles sunlight seems to move differently than in most places. It blazes, arching across the sky, like a banshee spreading its wings. From behind the wheel of your car, inching forward in the hellion-marked traffic... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: In SONG ONE, The Tune May Be Familiar, But The Performance Is Lovely

One of the great pleasures of experiencing music, especially genres such as pop, or - more pertinently for this review - indie folk, lies in the familiarity of its forms. Like comfort food for the ears, they follow well-established stylistic... More »
  

Review: WAVES, A Quietly Emotional Cross-Cultural Drama

In Don Gerardo Frasco's Waves, a seemingly idyllic island paradise in the Philippines unexpectedly turns into a battleground of mixed emotions for two friends-turned-secret-lovers desperately trying to revive a brief yet intense love affair that, at first sight, clearly falls... More »
By Patryk Czekaj   
  

Review: CAKE Serves Up Honest, Emotional Storytelling

"I hope you're ready to be depressed," whispered the person sitting next to me to no one in particular as the opening frames of Cake started to roll. Indeed, director Daniel Barnz's film about a woman confronting debilitating pain, drug... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Review: EX_MACHINA Starts Strong, But Falls Into Cliché

Alex Garland has become known for some pretty great sci-fi screenplays, such as 28 Days Later, Sunshine and Dredd. So it seems only natural that he would eventually direct one of his own works. Ex_Machina has some great elements, such as... More »
  

Review: VICE, Sexism Is Only Its First Offense

By featuring two scenes of repulsive violence against women in its early going, Vice digs itself into a deep hole. Theoretically, it's possible that Vice, an ostensible action vehicle driven by Thomas Jane -- with Bruce Willis sitting quietly in... More »
By Peter Martin   
  
 
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