Frightfest Glasgow 2015 Review: THE ATTICUS INSTITUTE Examines A Harrowing Legacy

Straddling the grey area between found footage and faux documentary, The Atticus Institute purports to investigate the events leading to the sudden closure of an underfunded centre for parapsychological research in 1976, and the disappearance, maybe even demise, of its... More »
By Anton Bitel   
  

Review: EVERLY Fails Its Heroine, Story, And The Audience

Joe Lynch's latest, Everly, is a fairly standard shoot-em-up action movie. Think Die Hard. Both take place at Christmas (a seasonal assault in its own right), but instead of resourceful Officer John McClane fighting off a swarm of bad guys... More »
By Rachel Fox   
  

Review: ANA MARIA IN NOVELA LAND, Charting The Familiar With Uncommon Insight

Young and willful, Ana Maria Soto loses jobs as easily as she live-tweets her favorite telenovela. It just comes naturally to the 24-year-old woman, who still lives at home with her middle-class parents and makes grand statements about her principles... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: WATCHERS OF THE SKY, How To Fight Genocide

Raphael. Ben. Samantha. Luis. Emmanuel. All are ordinary names for ordinary people who have one thing in common: an extraordinary desire to stop genocide. As explored in Edet Belzberg's documentary Watchers of the Sky, all five individuals recognized that a... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: JOY OF MAN'S DESIRING, An Unusually Mature And Assured Feature Debut

First-time helmer Sugita Masakazu made a splash at the Berlin International Film Festival last year with Joy of Man's Desiring, a quietly devastating and deeply lyrical picture paying tribute to all the children who have lost loved ones as a... More »
By Patryk Czekaj   
  

Review: KUNG FU ELLIOT, Canada's First Action Hero

Yes. You read that right. Canada's first action hero. China has Jackie Chan and Jet Li. America has Arnold and Sly. Europe has Jean-Claude Van Damme. And if Elliot Scott has his way, Canada will have... Elliot "White Lightning" Scott.... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: ALL THE WILDERNESS Digs Deep Into the Emotional Psyche of a Young Man

Once I was a teenager. Granted, that's been many years ago. But it's amazing how quickly long-submerged feelings bubble to the surface when given the right poke in the psyche. The poker, in this case, is wielded by writer/director Michael... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Spokane 2015 Review: THE WOUND AND THE GIFT Exquisitely Explores The Bridge Between Human And Animal Consciousness

The phrase "animal rescue" suggests that humans are the rescuers, but The Wound And The Gift sets out to demonstrate, through gorgeous animation and exquisite cinematography, how this anthropocentric bias fails to capture the uniqueness, complexity, and reciprocity of relationships... More »
By Stuart Muller   
  

Spokane 2015 Review: The QUEENS OF ROLEO And Their Pond Monkey King

From 1958 to 1972, the small rural town of Lewiston, Idaho produced four Queens Of Roleo; women who reigned supreme in the sport of logrolling, and who together accounted for 11 World Championships in just 14 years. This would be... More »
By Stuart Muller   
  

Spokane 2015 Review: DRYLAND Combines Demolition Derbies And The Waning Of Wheat Farmers In Washington

O beautiful for spacious skies. For amber waves of grain. The Palouse region of the inland northwest is one of the wheat breadbaskets of the world. I recently relocated to this area and frequently commute from my small town of... More »
By Stuart Muller   
  

Review: THE LAST FIVE YEARS Showcases Immense Talents In Intimate Settings

It's common knowledge that a pure musical takes more than a bit of suspension of disbelief. From the first notes, you kind of have to go with the flow, taking in the abstraction as it comes. On stage, this level... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Rotterdam 2015 Review: HARUKO'S PARANORMAL LABORATORY Drowns In Quirk

(I'll never yell at my television again, lest it suddenly changes into an attractive member of the opposite sex... hey, wait-a-minute!) Last year, Japanese director Lisa Takeba presented her first feature film The Pinkie at the International Film Festival Rotterdam... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Rotterdam 2015 Review: ANOTHER TRIP TO THE MOON Is Both Sedate And Trippy

(Once upon a time, there were two beautiful young women, hunting in a forest...) What is the border between still photography and moving pictures? Footage shot by a camera pointed at a waterfall or a fireplace may technically be the... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Berlinale 2015 Review: KNIGHT OF CUPS Sees Malick Repurposed

Rejoice ye fans of Malick - your wily transcendentalist has emerged again! And though the film doesn't equal (ahem... transcend) his previous highs, Knight Of Cups at least finds the idiosyncratic auteur trying something new. Malick's style remains the same;... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Review: BHOPAL: A PRAYER FOR RAIN Makes An Earnest, Sincere Entreaty

It's one thing to glance at a headline about a terrible tragedy. It's quite another to witness actions over a period of months that eventually lead to a horrifying disaster. Inspired by a true story, Bhopal: A Prayer for Rain,... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: WE ARE THE GIANT, Revolution In The Face Of Fear

You say you want a revolution. But are you willing to remain peaceful in the face of violence? Are you willing to die for your beliefs? Muhannan was a happy young man, according to the documentary We Are the Giant,... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Twitchvision: Jason Gorber Talks STILL ALICE And JUPITER ASCENDING

Back in studio this week, featuring a look at the latest film from the Wachowski siblings, Jupiter Ascending, along with the Julianne Moore-starring, Academy Award shoe-in Still Alice.Video embedded below... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Berlinale 2015 Review: QUEEN OF EARTH Proves How Great Faces Look On Film

Alex Ross Perry is a more than promising young director. He courageously combines intimacy, humor and a sense for cinematic language and form. Nevertheless, his latest, Queen of Earth, is a step back for the young director in terms of maturity... More »
  

Rotterdam 2015 Review: SET ME FREE Impressively Keeps It Real

(Here's someone literally begging to be taken to church...) In Kim Tae-yong's debut film Set Me Free (original Korean title Geo-in), he deals with the memories he has about one of the darkest moments in his own childhood. His parents... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Sundance 2015 Review: CALL ME LUCKY, Bobcat Goldthwait Documents His Mentor

I admit that when I first saw Bobcat Goldthwait on screen sometime in the 1980s, he of the Grover voice making me laugh in the second Police Academy movie, it never occurred to me that he'd be helming one... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  
 
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