Hollywood Reviews - Stars, Deals, Reviews

Review: HANNIBAL Says Goodbye

I woke up at 4:39 this morning, thinking of Hannibal, the man, the series, and the serial killer, awash in blood and viscera. Through three seasons of Hannibal, Mads Mikkelsen has redefined the character created by novelist Thomas Harris. The... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: NO ESCAPE Shows Us The Asia That Americans Should Be Afraid Of

Asia is terrifying. With its obscure languages, stifling humidity, tropical foliage, peculiar deities, dubious military regimes, weird food and proximity to historically hazardous war zones, American citizens would be insane to go near any part of it. The only Westerners... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: AMERICAN ULTRA, Ultra Violent Yet Ultra Forgettable

We've seen a lot of Americans at the movies in the past decade or so. American Beauty, American Sniper, American Gangster, American Movie, American Hardcore, American Pie - the list goes on and on. It's been a veritable melting pot... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: HITMAN: AGENT 47, An Action Movie With A Really Short Attention Span

Action fans are like alcoholics: we need our fix! Hitman: Agent 47 isn't up to the task. Granted, my opening words might sound like I'm minimizing the seriousness of alcoholism, and that's not my intention. But those of us who... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Book Review: Piers Bizony's THE MAKING OF STANLEY KUBRICK'S 2001: A SPACE ODYSSEY

(My God, it's full of fold-outs...!) Last year, the German publishing house Taschen released an astonishing holy grail for fans of Stanley Kubrick's seminal science fiction film 2001: A Space Odyssey: a boxset which included four book volumes, enclosed in... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: THE MAN FROM U.N.C.L.E. Targets Style Over Spying

For its big screen reboot of the classic 60s spy series, Warner Brothers is hoping Guy Ritchie can replicate the success of their earlier Sherlock Holmes adaptations, again favouring witty banter and period detail over the material's more action-oriented elements.... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Review: STRAIGHT OUTTA COMPTON, An Artful And Entertaining Musical Biopic

"You are now about to witness the strength of street knowledge." So begins the title track of NWA's seminal 1988 album Straight Outta Compton, a hip-hop landmark that almost single-handedly changed the direction of the art form. The making of... More »
  

Review: FANTASTIC FOUR Reboot Made From Unstable Molecules

Sigh. I guess it's clobberin' time... Not to spoil anything, but at the end of 20th Century Fox's latest reboot of the Fantastic Four, we're left with a giant crater. In more ways than one. The pop culture desolation remaining in... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: RICKI AND THE FLASH, Even Meryl Streep Can't Do Everything

As an actress, Meryl Streep can do just about anything. Too bad she can't rescue a movie that doesn't know whether it's a routine dysfunctional family comedy-drama or a portrait of a musician coming to terms with the failure of... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Blu-ray Review: THE FANTASTIC FILMS OF RAY HARRYHAUSEN

Visual special effects have evolved enormously over the years. In this day and age, it would seem that nothing is impossible in the movies. Animals, aliens, robots, machines and monsters could all be made to interact seamlessly with humans and... More »
By Hugo Ozman   
  

Review: VACATION Is A Trip Worth Taking

Vacation, a continuation of sorts from the series of National Lampoon associated flicks from the 80s and 90s, is far better than it has any right to be. The trailer, for one, looked appalling - a series of hackneyed jokes... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: A LEGO BRICKUMENTARY, A Well-Built Kit

Piece by piece, A LEGO Brickumentary builds a cohesive look the history of the popular toy, and the current subcultures that have emerged around it. Technically the second "LEGO" movie in so many years, this documentary should not be mistaken for... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: MISSION IMPOSSIBLE: ROGUE NATION, Back To Basics And All The Better For It

Ethan Hunt and co. are back in a familiar yet thrilling new instalment to the Mission Impossible franchise, which sees IMF's top agent face his most formidable foe yet. Following right on cue from Mad Max: Fury Road, Rogue Nation... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: SOUTHPAW Fights Itself To A Draw

Movies about boxers enjoyed a revival in the 1970s, marked by the popularity of Rocky, a well-made tale about an underdog getting a shot at the title, and the artistry of Raging Bull, which depicted the savagery of the sport... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: PIXELS, Game Over From The Get-go

Summer blockbusters get the Happy Madison treatment in space invasion action-comedy Pixels, the most excruciating experience you shouldn't put yourself through this season. A thoroughly unconvincing action lead, Adam Sandler phones in yet another performance, but no one comes away... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: TRAINWRECK, A Decidedly Safe Ride To Coupledom

Comedienne Amy Schumer has drawn a lot of eyes (and sometimes ire) for her Comedy Central sketch show Inside Amy Schumer, which lampoons, subverts and raises the ground under many traditional American roles women find themselves pigeonholed in at work,... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Fantasia 2015 Review: ANT-MAN, A Cog In The Mighty Marvel Machine

It's always a bit of a danger judging a film by why it's not, or by what it could have been, versus what it actually is. This factor is made even more manifest when a beloved, fan-fav filmmaker leaves... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Review: THE GALLOWS, Screaming, Crying, And Dying, Yet Still Recording

The latest offering from the Blumhouse Productions factory, The Gallows comes up with two new angles to explore otherwise familiar found-footage territory. First, a good portion of the footage is presented from the point of view of a very unlikable... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: SELF/LESS Wants To Be Something More, Whatever That Means

No one in sound mind and body wants to die, and that includes Ben Kingsley in the new film by Tarsem Singh. The director made his feature debut with the visually-striking The Cell in 2000, which raised expectations for bizarre... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: TERMINATOR GENISYS, The Embodiment Of Fan Disservice

The fifth instalment of the troubled sci-fi time travel series reveals itself to be a frustrating reboot-sequel hybrid, cherry-picking iconic moments from throughout the franchise and reworking them into a confused and mostly absurd new narrative. The result is a... More »
By James Marsh   
  
 
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