Review: SEVENTH SON, Generic And Self-Serious Fantasy Fare

A bad spell seems to have been cast on Seventh Son. Sergei Bodrov's first American feature - to whom we owe the impressive 2007's Mongol - saw its release indefinitely delayed. Originally slated to hit US theaters on February 2013,... More »
  

Review: THE INTERVIEW Deserves To Be More Than A Footnote

In 1940, just months after Wermacht tanks rolled over their borders in lightning strikes, a film came out that made the elected leader of Germany look like the fatuous lunatic that he was. Playing both the Jewish Barber and... More »
  

Review: TOP FIVE, Chris Rock's Very Funny And Most Personal Film Yet

Rude, crude, and lewd as it is, Top Five is still a big step forward for Chris Rock as a filmmaker. In essence, that's because it more closely resembles his brilliant stand-up shows, where he gets on a roll and... More »
  

Blu-Ray Review: KINGDOM OF HEAVEN Ultimate Edition - A Primer for EXODUS

A decade before Ridley Scott brought Exodus: Gods and Kings to the big screen, he tackled another epic about religion, faith and pragmatism. Kingdom of Heaven was Scott's film about the Crusades, a rousing, rambunctious film that tried to... More »
  

Review: THE HOBBIT: THE BATTLE OF THE FIVE ARMIES, An Epic Poem

Rarely in cinema history has the notion of a journey there and back again been more aptly applied. Yes, the culmination of Peter Jackson & co.'s vast epic comes in an episode titled The Battle of the Five Armies,... More »
  

Review: EXODUS: GODS AND KINGS Is Lost In The Wilderness

Meeting, but rarely exceeding, expectations, Ridley Scott's grand retelling of Moses and the Hebrews' flight from Egypt is strong on visuals and A-list presence, but slight on narrative and characterisation. Christian Bale and Joel Egerton both put in fine performances... More »
  

Review: THE HOMESMAN Takes Tommy Lee Jones Out To Pasture

Hollywood's most high-falutin' varmint must be Tommy Lee Jones. As difficult and humorless as he's perceived to be (and sometimes said to actually be), he's gone and built a career on imbuing a certain curmudgeonly ease into whatever films he... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: THE PENGUINS OF MADAGASCAR Rules The Animated Comedy Roost

I don't know whether to call this a TV spin-off or a bigger franchise's "side project." Whatever it is, The Penguins of Madagascar is something fresh to me. I went in, kids in tow, knowing nothing. I haven't laughed this hard... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Review: THE HUNGER GAMES: MOCKINGJAY - PART 1 Slows Series To A Crawl

With two global smashes that have banked $1.5 billion between them, the Hunger Games series has captured the imagination of spectators around the world with a well-balanced combination of spectacle and emotional depth. Mockingjay - Part 1, the first part... More »
  

Book Review: APPROACHING THE END Brings Us To A New Understanding Of Apocalyptic Cinema

We are living in a cinematic world. It seems that every day that passes it becomes more and more apparent that our experience of the world, how we see it and build our opinions based on it, is being strongly... More »
  

Review: INTERSTELLAR Is a Breathtaking Marriage of Ambition and Heart

While spectacle is easy to come by on the marquees these days, as blockbuster sequels and redoes each try to one up each other, we are seldom treated to something that is new and truly special. With imagination, ambition, heart... More »
  

Review: STONEHEARST ASYLUM Offers Pleasant Darkness But Little Else

Despite a cast that includes Ben Kingsley, Michael Caine, and Kate Beckinsale, and a noteworthy director in Brad Anderson, Stonehearst Asylum feels like a high-class 1970s TV movie. Anderson remains in my mind as a director of independent genre movies... More »
  

Review: OUIJA Fails To Go Bump In The Dark

I'm sure I speak along with the rest of the world when I proclaim, "Oh good, another movie based on a board game." But then again, has an Ouija board ever really been considered merely a board game? For years,... More »
By Jim Tudor   
  

Tokyo 2014 Review: BIG HERO 6, Sentimental Fun for Gamer Kids

As the opener of the Tokyo International Film Festival, the world premiere of Disney Animation Studio's adaptation of Marvel property Big Hero 6 couldn't be more fitting. Set in a world of technological innovation and a city directly inspired by this... More »
  

Sitges 2014 Review: MONSTERS: DARK CONTINENT, An Intense Yet Alienating Ordeal

Four years after Gareth Edwards exploded onto the sci-fi scene with his inventive and industrious indie alien invasion flick Monsters, first-time director Tom Green delivers a sequel that bears little resemblance to the original, in tone, content or invention.Reportedly set... More »
  

Review: FURY Treads On Unsettled Ground

I found myself liking Fury almost against my best judgment, ignoring some of its overt flaws in favour of enjoying the ride. It might be because I'm a sucker for claustrophobic battle films. It may have been Das Boot... More »
  

Review: DRACULA UNTOLD Reimagines A Reluctant Vampire Action Hero

Surprisingly effective, the latest iteration of the Dracula legacy seeks to rebuild vampire-movie mythology by going back to the beginning. First published in 1897, Bram Stoker's novel inspired F.W. Murnau's unofficial adaptation Nosferatu in 1922, which then sparked a series... More »
  

Review: ANNABELLE Is Worse Than Being Given An Antique Doll As A Gift

It is understandable that Warner Brothers and New Line would want to continue the success of last year's The Conjuring. The period haunted house flick proved a surprise summer smash last year, grossing over $300 million worldwide. Annabelle focuses on... More »
  

Vancouver 2014 Review: WHITE BIRD IN A BLIZZARD, Gregg Araki's Nostalgic, Seductive Puzzle

Gregg Araki's latest offering, White Bird In A Blizzard, is set during the time period when Araki first began making films (1988-1991). Because of this, the sets and costumes are rendered with a loving nostalgia that never feels overly novel.... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: GONE GIRL, Meticulously Crafted And Unabashedly Trashy

Gone Girl, David Fincher's latest, and New York Film Festival opener, based on the bestselling novel by Gillian Flynn, begins with a close-up of its central married couple, Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) and Amy Dunne (Rosamund Pike). Nick is gently... More »
  
 
  Next »
Page 1 of 120