Shelagh M. Rowan-Legg
London, England

Shelagh is a Toronto-born, Europe-based writer. She also a programmer for Film4 FrightFest and Toronto After Dark Film Festival, and recently completed her PhD on contemporary Spanish fantastic film.

Hey London! The Miskatonic Institute Opens Next Month! Horror for All!

Horror film fans tend to be more interested in the how and why of their films, and now fans in London can take advantage of even more knowledge coming their way. The Miskatonic Institute of Horror Studies, founded first in... More »
  

MELBOURNE, THE BOY AND THE WORLD Win at Cairo 2014

The Iranian film Melbourne was awarded the Golden Pyramid for Best Picture at the Cairo International Film Festival this past Tuesday. I was lucky enough to attend the festival for this first time this year; besides having an excellent programming... More »
  

Cairo 2014 Review: MELBOURNE, An Intense Domestic Suspense

One of the most gripping films I've seen in ages, Nima Javidi's fiction feature debut Melbourne just won the Golden Pyramid for Best Film at the Cairo International Film Festival, and deservedly so. It proves that you don't need an... More »
  

Cairo 2014 Review: JOY OF MAN'S DESIRING, The Poetry of Work

While many factory jobs have moved to countries like Mexico or China, Canada still has its fair share of manufacturing. Most of us probably don't think about where many of our goods come from, or the difficult and often... More »
  

Cairo 2014 Review: SAND DOLLARS, Bodies in Tempetuous Love

Most people would probably like to think that, when it comes to love, we get wiser as we get older, more able to tell who truly loves us and who is using us. But sometimes that chemical reaction takes over,... More »
  

Cairo 2014 Review: DECOR, A Modern Meta-Twist on the 'Woman's Picture'

Maha and her husband Sherif are talented set designers, who have been hired to work on their first commercial film (as oppose to the independent, art house films they usually prefer). On the first day of shooting, when Maha is... More »
  

Cairo 2014 Review: SILVERED WATER, SYRIA SELF PORTRAIT Will Break Your Heart

We often see fleeting images of war and its victims, or brief scenes of torture on the news, but these are often presented in a sensational way, or sometimes sanitized, or more than often, ignored if they are happening in... More »
  

Cairo 2014 Review: A CINEMA OF DISCONTENT Deftly Explores Censorship

I'm sure many cinephiles are familiar with the Motion Picture Production Code, used by Hollywood in the mid-20th century to govern 'morality' in films. A self-imposed censorship, it banned any sexual acts beyond kissing, excessive violence, profanity, and many other... More »
  

Cairo 2014 Review: THE BOY AND THE WORLD, Wonderous Animation and Storytelling

Within the first few frames, it's easy to see why The Boy and The World won both Best Feature and the audience award at Annecy International Animated Film Festival, considered to be the most important of its kind. This is... More »
  

Cairo 2014 Review: QUEEN AND COUNTRY, Funny and Heartfelt Nostalgia

John Boorman's 1987 film Hope and Glory, about the London Blitz seen through the eyes of a nine-year-old boy, is a favourite in the Rowan-Legg household (seriously, we can all quote it almost verbatim to the point of annoying guests).... More »
  

Cairo 2014 Review: THE CHALLAT OF TUNIS, Brilliant And Disturbing Satire

The words 'satire' and 'mockumentary', when referring to films, might automatically be thought to reference humour. But there is no humour, except very dark, in director Kaouther Ben Hania's brilliant The Challat of Tunis. It is a searing portrait of... More »
  

Cairo 2014 Review: THE CUT, A Good Epic Journey

With the exception of Atom Egoyan's Ararat, the Armenian Genocide has not had much attention in Western cinema. German-Turkish filmmaker Fatih Akin, whose previous films have often looked at issues of the marginalized, transnational cultures and violence, attempts to tackle... More »
  

Cairo 2014 Review: THEEB Doesn't Quite Live Up to its Promise

Stories of war or violent conflict can often seem more acute and terrifying through the eyes of a child, especially if it is only from the periphery, when the child knows less than the audience. Theeb, Jordanian director Naji Abu's... More »
  

Full Disclosure 2014 The Directors Cut: Werner Herzog

After a couple of months off, Full Disclosure is back, with an exploration of the work of a true cinematic maverick, Werner Herzog. In a career spanning 50 years, the uniquely accented German filmmaker has gifted us dozens of feature... More »
  

Review: SET FIRE TO THE STARS is Cinematic Poetry and Rage

It isn't easy to portray the literary arts on screen. Apart from having someone recite from a book (which can become tedious), the challenge becomes how to find the connection between the writer being portrayed, their work, and how that... More »
  

Aspiring Canadian Women Genre Writers! There's a Contest Just for You!

While things haven't always been good for women behind the camera in fantastic film, the tide seems to be turning. With the international success of filmmakers like the Soska sisters (American Mary), Jennifer Kent (The Babadook), Kristina Buozyte (Vanishing Waves)... More »
  

Watch SET FIRE TO THE STARS Trailer, Poetic Beauty And Trouble

Wales' most famous literary son, Dylan Thomas (A Child's Christmas in Wales, Under Milk Wood) led a relatively short life, but a successful one, one that has not, until now, appeared much on screen. Set Fire to the Stars premiered... More »
  

Opening: AUTOMATA, Intense And Gripping Science Fiction

Spanish filmmaker Gabe Ibáñez's long-awaited second feature Autómata is an intense and gripping dystopian story, bordering on European surrealism within a classical narrative. Certainly, many current films present a weary and negative view of humanity's future, be it death by... More »
  

Interview: AUTOMATA Director Gabe Ibáñez Talks Banderas, Robots, And The Future

Opening in the US tomorrow, Autómata is a dystopian science-fiction film starring Antonio Banderas, set in a future where the human population is decimated, the world practically a desert, and robots are evolving. I spoke with director Gabe Ibáñez at... More »
  

Sitges 2014 Review: MAGICAL GIRL, Dark, Twisted Magic

Carlos Vermut's second feature Magical Girl recently won the Golden Shell at the a Sebastian Film Festival, as well as best director award, and deservedly so. Fun and disturbing, strange and yet somehow entirely plausible, the film tells the story of... More »
  
 
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