Christopher Bourne
New York City, New York

Chris is a film critic, editor, blogger, incurable cinephile, and all-around culture maven. He blogs on film at The Bourne Cinema Conspiracy.

Margaret Mead Film Festival 2014 Offers Provocative, Moving Global Documentaries

The 2014 edition of the Margaret Mead Film Festival, a great annual documentary fest which screens at the American Museum of Natural History and runs this year from October 23-26, has as this year's theme "Past Forward." According to the festival,... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: BIRDMAN, A Visual and Comedic Feast For The Eyes and Mind

This year's New York Film Festival came to a satisfying conclusion with one of its best selections, Birdman, or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance), the oddly titled (and punctuated) fifth feature by acclaimed Mexican filmmaker Alejandro G. Iñárritu. Returning in... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: CITIZENFOUR, The Chilling Story Behind Edward Snowden's Explosive Revelations

In this year's New York Film Festival there were two gripping thrillers, both receiving their world premieres at the festival, and, intriguingly enough, both featuring moodily effective scores by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross. One was David Fincher's novel adaptation... More »
  

NYC Happenings: "Stephen Chow: The King of Comedy," An Appreciation of the Popular and Versatile Hong Kong Actor-Director

Hong Kong actor and writer-director Stephen Chow has been an immensely popular figure in Asia since first appearing on TV and in films in the late 1980s. He is best known in the West, however, for his two breakout international hits... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: In MISUNDERSTOOD, A Little Girl Contends With A Family From Hell

Leo Tolstoy famously opened his classic novel Anna Karenina with this statement: "Happy families are all alike. But all unhappy families are unhappy in their own way." You'd be hard pressed to find a family much unhappier than the one... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: THE PRINCESS OF FRANCE, Matias Pineiro's Beguiling Riff On Shakespeare

The Princess of France is Argentine director Matías Piñeiro's third entry in his series of Shakespeare-inspired films, which he calls his "Shakespearead." The first two of these were his 43-minute short Rosalinda (2011), inspired by "As You Like It," and... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: GONE GIRL, Meticulously Crafted And Unabashedly Trashy

Gone Girl, David Fincher's latest, and New York Film Festival opener, based on the bestselling novel by Gillian Flynn, begins with a close-up of its central married couple, Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) and Amy Dunne (Rosamund Pike). Nick is gently... More »
  

NYC Happenings: "Also Like Life: The Films Of Hou Hsiao-hsien" Celebrates A Taiwanese Master

In a key scene of Hou Hsiao-hsien's 1993 masterwork The Puppetmaster, in which the titular figure Li Tien-lu (who appeared in small roles in Hou's previous films) takes center stage to tell his story, Li explains why he named his... More »
  

Twitch Film Celebrates 10 Years

A decade is an absolute eternity online, a marker that I certainly never thought I'd reach when registering the first domain for Twitch ten years ago now, and yet here we are. Honestly, I never thought much of anything about... More »
By Todd Brown   
  

NYC Happenings: "Yesterday, Today, Tomorrow: The Cinema of Patrick Lung Kong" Spotlights A Pioneer Of Hong Kong Cinema

It's a safe bet that the vast majority of regular readers of Twitch are very familiar with John Woo and Tsui Hark's A Better Tomorrow, the 1986 classic of Hong Kong action cinema. But it's an equally safe bet that... More »
  

Review: I ORIGINS, Ludicrous And Contrived, Yet Still Creates A Spell

"The eyes are the windows to the soul." This particular cliché forms the narrative and philosophical basis of Mike Cahill's latest, I Origins, which follows in the high-concept, indie sci-fi vein of his first feature, Another Earth (2004). The title also... More »
  

Japan Cuts 2014 Review: TALE OF A BUTCHER SHOP, A Sensitively Observed Documentary Of A Working-Class Family

Tale of a Butcher Shop, Hanabusa Aya's sensitively observed documentary on a family of butchers in Kaizuka City in Osaka, Japan, begins in a very startling fashion, with an unflinching depiction of a cow's slaughtering. A man leads the cow... More »
  

Japan Cuts 2014 Review: LOVE'S WHIRLPOOL Offers Potent Mix of Eroticism, Comedy, And Melancholy

Miura Daisuke (Boys on the Run) adapts his own award-winning 2005 play Love's Whirlpool into his latest film of the same name, and it is quite a remarkable and wonderfully acted film where sex is the main subject and the... More »
  

Japan Cuts 2014 Review: 0.5MM, A Darkly Comedic Probe Of Japan's Historical And Social Psyche

The remarkable Japanese director Ando Momoko expands her cinematic canvas considerably with her second feature, 0.5mm, a major highlight of this year's Japan Cuts festival. It's a deceptively small film that tackles big subjects, an intimate film with an epic three... More »
  

Japan Cuts 2014 Review: MONSTERZ, In Which Nakata Hideo Misfires With A Lackluster Remake

The slow but steady decline of the once-great Nakata Hideo (The Ring, Chaos, Dark Water) continues unabated with his latest, Monsterz. This is a remake of Haunters, the 2010 Korean film by Kim Min-seok that itself was no classic, but had... More »
  

Japan Cuts 2014 Review: WOOD JOB! Takes Us Deep Into the World Of Forestry, With Wonderfully Comic Results

The recent Japanese film Wood Job! is not, despite its very suggestive title, a pornographic film, which will either relieve or disappoint you, depending on where your movie tastes happen to lie. Instead, it is the latest comedy by Yaguchi... More »
  

Review: LAND HO!, An Immensely Charming Trip To Iceland

The wonderfully freewheeling, peripatetic road movie Land Ho!, spanning the vast, rich Icelandic landscape, marks the first collaboration between two talented independent filmmakers: Martha Stephens (Passenger Pigeons, Pilgrim Song) and Aaron Katz (Dance Party USA, Quiet City, Cold Weather). Together,... More »
  

Preview: Japan Cuts 2014 Gets Cute, Crude And Contemplative

Opening tonight with the US premiere of Miike Takashi's The Mole Song: Undercover Agent Reiji, Japan Cuts, the New York festival of contemporary Japanese cinema, is a grand smorgasbord for cinephiles of all tastes. Well, at least for those residing... More »
  

NY Asian 2014 Review: HOPE, Devastatingly Sad Yet Beautifully Uplifting

One of the drawbacks of being a working critic is that the volume of film viewing this necessitates, trying to keep up with new releases, festival and retrospective screenings and such, can tend to flatten out your emotional responses to... More »
  

NY Asian 2014 Review: BLIND MASSAGE, An Artful And Affecting Ensemble Drama

Often controversial Chinese filmmaker Lou Ye delivers one of his finest films with Blind Massage, a delicately observed and artfully directed ensemble drama, based on the novel of the same name by Bi Feiyu. Putting aside, at least for the... More »
  
 
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