Christopher Bourne
New York City, New York

Chris is a film critic, editor, blogger, incurable cinephile, and all-around culture maven. He blogs on film at The Bourne Cinema Conspiracy.

Review: I ORIGINS, Ludicrous And Contrived, Yet Still Creates A Spell

"The eyes are the windows to the soul." This particular cliché forms the narrative and philosophical basis of Mike Cahill's latest, I Origins, which follows in the high-concept, indie sci-fi vein of his first feature, Another Earth (2004). The title also... More »
  

Japan Cuts 2014 Review: TALE OF A BUTCHER SHOP, A Sensitively Observed Documentary Of A Working-Class Family

Tale of a Butcher Shop, Hanabusa Aya's sensitively observed documentary on a family of butchers in Kaizuka City in Osaka, Japan, begins in a very startling fashion, with an unflinching depiction of a cow's slaughtering. A man leads the cow... More »
  

Japan Cuts 2014 Review: LOVE'S WHIRLPOOL Offers Potent Mix of Eroticism, Comedy, And Melancholy

Miura Daisuke (Boys on the Run) adapts his own award-winning 2005 play Love's Whirlpool into his latest film of the same name, and it is quite a remarkable and wonderfully acted film where sex is the main subject and the... More »
  

Japan Cuts 2014 Review: 0.5MM, A Darkly Comedic Probe Of Japan's Historical And Social Psyche

The remarkable Japanese director Ando Momoko expands her cinematic canvas considerably with her second feature, 0.5mm, a major highlight of this year's Japan Cuts festival. It's a deceptively small film that tackles big subjects, an intimate film with an epic three... More »
  

Japan Cuts 2014 Review: MONSTERZ, In Which Nakata Hideo Misfires With A Lackluster Remake

The slow but steady decline of the once-great Nakata Hideo (The Ring, Chaos, Dark Water) continues unabated with his latest, Monsterz. This is a remake of Haunters, the 2010 Korean film by Kim Min-seok that itself was no classic, but had... More »
  

Japan Cuts 2014 Review: WOOD JOB! Takes Us Deep Into the World Of Forestry, With Wonderfully Comic Results

The recent Japanese film Wood Job! is not, despite its very suggestive title, a pornographic film, which will either relieve or disappoint you, depending on where your movie tastes happen to lie. Instead, it is the latest comedy by Yaguchi... More »
  

Review: LAND HO!, An Immensely Charming Trip To Iceland

The wonderfully freewheeling, peripatetic road movie Land Ho!, spanning the vast, rich Icelandic landscape, marks the first collaboration between two talented independent filmmakers: Martha Stephens (Passenger Pigeons, Pilgrim Song) and Aaron Katz (Dance Party USA, Quiet City, Cold Weather). Together,... More »
  

Preview: Japan Cuts 2014 Gets Cute, Crude And Contemplative

Opening tonight with the US premiere of Miike Takashi's The Mole Song: Undercover Agent Reiji, Japan Cuts, the New York festival of contemporary Japanese cinema, is a grand smorgasbord for cinephiles of all tastes. Well, at least for those residing... More »
  

NY Asian 2014 Review: HOPE, Devastatingly Sad Yet Beautifully Uplifting

One of the drawbacks of being a working critic is that the volume of film viewing this necessitates, trying to keep up with new releases, festival and retrospective screenings and such, can tend to flatten out your emotional responses to... More »
  

NY Asian 2014 Review: BLIND MASSAGE, An Artful And Affecting Ensemble Drama

Often controversial Chinese filmmaker Lou Ye delivers one of his finest films with Blind Massage, a delicately observed and artfully directed ensemble drama, based on the novel of the same name by Bi Feiyu. Putting aside, at least for the... More »
  

NY Asian 2014 Review: GOLDEN CHICKENSSS, In Which the Third Time Isn't Entirely the Charm

The 2002 comedy Golden Chicken and its 2003 sequel Golden Chicken 2, starring Hong Kong's queen of comedy Sandra Ng, were love letters both to Ng herself, who was given perhaps the greatest showcase committed to film of her formidable... More »
  

Preview: New York Asian Film Festival, Still Crazy After All These Years

A mainstay in the NYC cinephile scene for thirteen yeas, the New York Asian Film Festival could be called an institution, but can something that is often so much fun as NYAFF be called as such? In short, yes. Despite... More »
  

BAMcinemaFest 2014 Brings An Impressively Diverse Slate To Brooklyn

The sixth edition of BAMcinemaFest, screening at BAM Rose Cinemas and the Steinberg Screen at BAM Harvey Theater from June 18 through June 29, brings a typically diverse and eclectic selection of features, shorts, and retrospective screenings to downtown Brooklyn.... More »
  

Review: MANUSCRIPTS DON'T BURN, An Angry, Raw and Chilling Protest Against State Censorship in Iran

Manuscripts Don't Burn, a searingly angry, chilling, and despairing work by Iranian filmmaker Mohammad Rasoulof, is a visceral reminder that the ability to express oneself freely, whether in journalistic or creative endeavors, is never something to be taken for granted... More »
  

KINO! 2014 Revamped Festival Continues to Showcase New German Cinema in NYC

After its previous 35-year relationship with the Museum of Modern Art, the 2014 edition of the KINO! Festival of German Films in New York reboots in new locations, but still continues its mission of bringing notable recent German films to... More »
  

Brooklyn Film Festival 2014 Transcends Formula To Deliver Fascinating Films From Around The World

The Brooklyn Film Festival, the largest and longest running competitive, international film festival in Brooklyn, will run its 17th annual edition from May 30 through June 8 in Williamsburg, at indieScreen and Windmill Studios NYC. Don't let the festival's title... More »
  

NYC Happenings: "All Hail The King: The Films of King Hu" Pays Tribute To The Master Martial Arts Film Director

Not only martial arts fans, but cinephiles in general are in for a rare treat this summer when the retrospective "All Hail The King: The Films of King Hu" arrives at BAM Rose Cinemas in Brooklyn from June 6 through... More »
  

Tribeca 2014 Review: MISCONCEPTION Challenges What You Think You Know About Overpopulation

Jessica Yu has created some of the finest and most formally innovative documentaries of the past decade, such as In the Realms of the Unreal (2004) and Protagonist (2007). Her latest film Misconception, which recently had its world premiere at... More »
  

Tribeca 2014 Review: ICE POISON, A Mesmerizing, Stark Depiction of Drugs and Poverty in Burma

Grinding poverty and severely restricted life and economic choices push two impoverished denizens of Myanmar into drug dealing, and using, with predictably dire consequences in Midi Z's strong, stylistically assured third feature Ice Poison. As in his previous features Return... More »
  

Tribeca 2014 Review: LAND HO! Takes Us On An Immensely Charming Icelandic Road Trip

The wonderfully freewheeling, peripatetic road movie Land Ho!, spanning the vast, rich Icelandic landscape, marks the first collaboration between two talented independent filmmakers: Martha Stephens (Passenger Pigeons, Pilgrim Song) and Aaron Katz (Dance Party USA, Quiet City, Cold Weather). Together, they... More »
  
 
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