Christopher Bourne
Featured Critic; New York City, New York

Chris is a film critic, editor, blogger, incurable cinephile, and all-around culture maven. He blogs on film at The Bourne Cinema Conspiracy.

Review: PALI ROAD, An Intriguing Thriller That Doesn't Quite Go The Distance

Pali Road, the romantic mystery thriller directed by Jonathan Lim, derives its title from an actual road on the island of Oahu, Hawaii, where the film is set. This road is said to be haunted, with many mysterious and unexplainable... More »
  

Tribeca 2016 Review: FOLK HERO & FUNNY GUY, A Witty Tale Of Best Friends (And Frenemies) On The Road

One of the key ingredients for a successful film is a good title. And one thing that makes for a good title is one that is perfectly descriptive of the movie within.   Jeff Grace's witty, diverting feature debut Folk... More »
  

Tribeca 2016 Preview: Midnight, Spotlight, Viewpoints, & More

Tribeca 2016 officially kicked off last night but screenings really get down to business today. We've already taken a look at the US and International Narrative Competitions and the Documentaries playing across a few sections. Today we wrap up our... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Tribeca 2016 Preview: Documentaries

The Tribeca Film Fest has really carved a place out in the US festival landscape as one of the main homes for documentaries. This year's selection looks to be another strong program. Here are a few of the many docus... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Tribeca 2016 Preview: US & Int'l Narrative Comps

The Tribeca Film Festival kicks off its 2016 edition Wednesday and we've got a few previews for you throughout the week. We start things off with what is undoubtedly the most notable change to this year's festival. The good folks... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Essential Series: "Japan Sings! The Japanese Musical Film" Delights And Illuminates

It's a fact that's very easy to take for granted, especially if you've been living here for a long time, but New York is a city that offers nearly unlimited pleasures for movie fans, serious cinephiles and casual moviegoers alike.... More »
  

Review: AFTERNOON, A Moving, Intimate Conversation On Life And Art

I might as well get to the point right off the bat: Afternoon, the latest work by Taiwan’s master auteur Tsai Ming-liang, is to my mind, one of the most absorbing, humorous, movingly poignant, fascinating, and just plain loveliest films... More »
  

Review: CEMETERY OF SPLENDOUR, Dreamy Wonder And Painful Laments

The Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul, in his body of work consisting of six features, plus a number of short and medium length films, and also art installations, illuminates the landscapes of his native country in ways that often approximate trance-like... More »
  

NYC Happenings: Metrograph's First Calendar Is A Cinephile's Dream

New York's Lower East Side has been the city's cultural center for many decades now. But when it comes to art movie theaters, you had to go across Manhattan to Film Forum or schlep all the way up to Lincoln... More »
  

Review: In ALREADY TOMORROW IN HONG KONG, The Fundamental Things Apply

Here's the basic plotline of producer and now first-time writer-director Emily Ting's immensely charming romance Already Tomorrow in Hong Kong, boiled down to its basic essence. A man and a woman meet, and -- spoiler alert -- fall in love... More »
  

Review: BLEAK STREET, True Crime Turned Into A Visually Striking Dark Carnival

Bleak Street, the very appropriately named new film from veteran Mexican director Arturo Ripstein, is ripped from the headlines, much like the TV show "Law and Order." Inspired by the double murder of two dwarf men who were popular luchadores... More »
  

First Look 2016: Six Must-See Selections

The Museum of the Moving Image's First Look Festival, screening through January 24, is a wonderfully eclectic and eye-opening selection of films that transcend the boundaries of fiction, documentary, and experimental films. You can read Dustin Chang's overview of the... More »
  

Review: DIABLO, A Western That Makes Its Genre Generic

The Western film genre, a main staple of American movies decades ago, but nowadays much scarcer, is currently enjoying a mini-revival, spearheaded by the current 70mm roadshow release of Quentin Tarantino's The Hateful Eight, in which Tarantino continues to marry... More »
  

TwitchFilm's Top 10 Movies Of 2015

Here at TwitchFilm, we are pleased to feature contributions from dozens of people located all over the world, writing about the movies that intrigue, confound, anger, and delight them. While that makes us a distinctive site, it also makes it... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

"Nobuhiko Obayashi: A Retrospective": 5 Highlights From a Fantastic Oeuvre

"Nobuhiko Obayashi: A Retrospective," screening at Japan Society through December 6, offers a long-overdue (re)introduction to a fascinating and innovative filmmaker, one of the few of his generation still active. He's best known for his 1977 cult classic House, but... More »
  

NYC Happenings: "Nobuhiko Obayashi: A Retrospective," A Career-Spanning Showcase That Goes Far Beyond HOUSE

The Japanese filmmaker Obayashi Nobuhiko, now 77 and still quite active -- his most recent feature Seven Weeks screened at this year's Japan Cuts festival -- is best known in the U.S. for his 1977 debut feature House, his wild... More »
  

Margaret Mead Film Festival 2015 Expands The Boundaries Of Documentary And Visual Anthropology

The Margaret Mead Film Festival, one of New York's finest documentary and visual anthropology showcases, returns for its 2015 edition, screening from October 22-25 at the American Museum of Natural History. This year's edition will screen 57 films from over... More »
  

The New York Korean Film Festival 2015 Returns With An Impressive, Eclectic Lineup

Cinema fans in New York City will be in for a treat next month with the return of the New York Korean Film Festival, which will have its 13th edition at the Museum of the Moving Image from November... More »
  

New York 2015 Review: BRIDGE OF SPIES, A Thrilling Throwback To An Earlier Era

The New York Film Festival's transition in the past few years from being more or less purely a showcase for the crème-de-la-crème of world cinema (which it still largely is) to being an increasingly prominent stop on the way to... More »
  

New York 2015 Review: CEMETERY OF SPLENDOUR, A Beautiful and Beguiling Waking Dream

The Thai director Apichatpong Weerasethakul, in his body of work consisting of six features, plus a number of short and medium length films, and also art installations, illuminates the landscapes of his native country in ways that often approximate trance-like... More »
  
 
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