New York Asian 2015 Review: IT'S ALREADY TOMORROW IN HONG KONG, A Charming Romantic Travelogue

Here's the basic plotline of producer and now first-time writer-director Emily Ting's immensely charming romance It's Already Tomorrow in Hong Kong, boiled down to its basic essence. A man and a woman meet, and (spoiler alert) fall in love over... More »
  

Munich 2015 Review: CIVIL SERVANTS Gazes Behind The Scenes Of German Police

It is the doubt we even face when we are totally committed and the way we have to erase some of your principles to find a world we can live in. Civil Servants, the first feature-length documentary by Maria Wilke... More »
  

Munich 2015 Review: EMBRACE OF THE SERPENT Explores Spirits Of The Colombian Amazon

Inspired by Theodor Koch-Grunberg and Richard Evans Schultes, the first explorers of the Colombian Amazon, Embrace of the Serpent is a spiritual quest with a political regret. We follow two stories of German explorers (one of them is Jan... More »
  

New York Asian 2015 Review: TAKSU, An Erotically Charged Island Sojourn

Taksu, the second feature by actress, producer, and now director Sugino Kiki, takes its title from the Balinese concept (often associated with dance) of artistry and charisma that taps into divine, spiritual power. And though it may be going too... More »
  

Filmfest Munich Review: THE VOICE OF SOKUROV, Another Boring Film On An Exciting Filmmaker

It seems to be of great importance to film festivals around the globe to include films about filmmakers in their program. This genre guarantees a certain interest among the festival visitors and is usually very, well, boring. Of course, there... More »
  

LA Film Fest Review: VICTORIA, A Poem In Action

"You just had to be there" In a post-FOMO (fear of missing out) age this phrase is tantamount to death. "You just had to be there." It's what I said to Twitch Editor Ben Umstead as we walked out of... More »
  

LA Film Fest 2015 Review: TOO LATE A Confident, Stylish Debut

There is a classic Hollywood feel that prevails throughout Dennis Hauck's debut feature Too Late. Namely this is due to the fact that it's shot on good old 35MM film -- a feat almost never attempted in today's world of... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

LA Film Fest Review: I AM THALENTE, Skating On Passion, Finding Purpose

We all know the sound. That clack-scrape-whoosh of a skateboard on the sidewalk. For many of us it is as close to the sport as we get. When we hear that sound some of us move out of the way... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Sydney 2015 Review: Under The WIDE OPEN SKY, Children Pursue Their Love Of Music

Every autumn, Australian conductor Michelle Leonard drives 4,000 kms across the outback of New South Wales in order to audition over 2,000 children for her Moorambilla Voices choir. Wide Open Sky is a documentary by director Lisa Nicol that chronicles... More »
By Hugo Ozman   
  

Sydney 2015 Review: ON THE RIM OF THE SKY, The New Challenges The Old

In the Chinese province of Sichuan, one of the mountains is so high that it's literally "on the rim of the sky"; and in that mountain, there is an isolated village called Gulu. The villagers' children received their education at... More »
By Hugo Ozman   
  

Sydney 2015 Review: Witness Undying Love In MY LOVE, DON'T CROSS THAT RIVER

He was 98. She was 89. They were married for 76 years, had 12 children, six of whom died during their childhood. That is the story of Jo Byeong-man and Kang Gye Yeol, as told in director Jin Mo-young's My... More »
By Hugo Ozman   
  

Review: SPY, McCarthy Shines In Uproarious Espionage Send Up

Melissa McCarthy and Paul Feig team up once again for a wickedly funny send-up of the James Bond series with charm and wit in ample supply. Jude Law and Jason Statham add to the fun as, respectively, a suave, painfully... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Fantaspoa 2015 Review: Sam's POSSESSED Presents An Exorcism With Clay And A Fragmented Script

Possessed (aka Pos eso) is a peculiar Spanish animation which recalls the claymation classics of Wallace and Gromit for the design of its characters - after all the director Sam worked as an animator for Aardman - but not due to... More »
  

Cannes 2015 Review: Kurzel's MACBETH Is Shakespeare For The GAME OF THRONES Crowd

Justin Kurzel's Snowtown was a remarkable film, a brash feature debut that signaled the emergence of a unique talent joining a slew of them coming out of the Australian independent scene. Following up a powerful true crime story with... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: RAMS, An Exceptional Tale Of Exceptional Stubbornness

Oh, Iceland. With your otherworldly landscapes and ability to extract cool, dry drama like you're farming permafrost, your cinema is like your vistas -  inspiring and intimidating. Add to that some of the special spice that has made the... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Jeonju 2015 Review: UNWANTED BROTHER Puts Onus On Characters In Familiar Setting

After nearly a decade away from the director's chair, Shim Kwang-jin returns with an unhurried take on a common tale of a lowlife manipulating those around him to pay a debt. Propped up by a few fresh spins on the... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: COSMODRAMA, A French Metaphysical Star Trek

Science-fiction has never taken particularly strong roots in French cinema despite being born in hands of a certain Monsieur Meliés on French soil. And Gallic helmer Phillipe Fernandez is not likely to alter the status quo with his sophomore feature... More »
By Martin Kudlac   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: DHEEPAN, Powerful With Moments Of Sheer Bravado

It begins with chaos: shouting voices calling out in alarm, a cacophony of sound, and a flourish of a camera moving through a thick crowd. It ends with similar sounds and a similar shot, one far less sinister and... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: KRISHA Introduces An Exciting New Director In The Home Movie From Hell

Jean-Luc Godard once said that all you need for a movie is a gun and a girl. With Krisha, a rich psychological thriller about family secrets, mental-breakdown and addiction, director Trey Edward Shults proves that one can make compelling... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: Noé's LOVE Is Both Sticky and Sweet

Gaspar Noé. For some even the name sends shudders. Thoughts of the visually bombastic Enter the Void cause a kind of PTSD, and his Irreversable still haunts some 13 years on. The Argentine-born, France-based director occupies a unique and... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  
 
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