New York 2014 Review: BIRDMAN, A Visual and Comedic Feast For The Eyes and Mind

This year's New York Film Festival came to a satisfying conclusion with one of its best selections, Birdman, or (The Unexpected Virtue of Ignorance), the oddly titled (and punctuated) fifth feature by acclaimed Mexican filmmaker Alejandro G. Iñárritu. Returning in... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: CITIZENFOUR, The Chilling Story Behind Edward Snowden's Explosive Revelations

In this year's New York Film Festival there were two gripping thrillers, both receiving their world premieres at the festival, and, intriguingly enough, both featuring moodily effective scores by Trent Reznor and Atticus Ross. One was David Fincher's novel adaptation... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: THE 50 YEAR ARGUMENT Tells A Fiery Tale Of Words

Where to start reviewing a film like The 50 Year Argument? It's a question of approach that surely plagued Martin Scorsese when founding editor Robert B. Silvers first pitched him to tackle the subject of The New York Review of... More »
By Zach Gayne   
  

New York 2014 Review: Exorcising The Past in HORSE MONEY

Horse Money is astonishingly beautiful in its visual poetry! Pedro Costa, who wanted to capture the life in Lisbon's ghetto area called Fontainhas in the late 90s, made a beautiful film called Bones (Ossos). During the shoot, he saw much... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: In MISUNDERSTOOD, A Little Girl Contends With A Family From Hell

Leo Tolstoy famously opened his classic novel Anna Karenina with this statement: "Happy families are all alike. But all unhappy families are unhappy in their own way." You'd be hard pressed to find a family much unhappier than the one... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: THE PRINCESS OF FRANCE, Matias Pineiro's Beguiling Riff On Shakespeare

The Princess of France is Argentine director Matías Piñeiro's third entry in his series of Shakespeare-inspired films, which he calls his "Shakespearead." The first two of these were his 43-minute short Rosalinda (2011), inspired by "As You Like It," and... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: It's The Trip, Not The Destination, In INHERENT VICE

P. T. Anderson faithfully adapts Thomas Pynchon's most accessible novel, the zaniest surf noir, Inherent Vice. It is also the first time he's worked with a large ensemble cast since Magnolia. The result is often hilarious, a laborious snapshot of... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: EDEN, An Ambitious Yet Personal Look at 90s Electronic Dance Music Scene

The other day, I saw a college kid wearing a T- shirt that said, "In school now just to be a wage slave later." I seriously considered giving the kid a hug. And I could've easily regarded it as some... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: TIMBUKTU Is A Strong Condemnation Of Religious Extremism

Timbuktu, that faraway place, the end of the world, is an actual city in Northern Mali in Africa.  It was once a bustling trade town in sub-Saharan Africa and now famous for its fabulous architecture, libraries and scholars. Abderramane Sissako... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: GONE GIRL, Meticulously Crafted And Unabashedly Trashy

Gone Girl, David Fincher's latest, and New York Film Festival opener, based on the bestselling novel by Gillian Flynn, begins with a close-up of its central married couple, Nick Dunne (Ben Affleck) and Amy Dunne (Rosamund Pike). Nick is gently... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: THE BLUE ROOM Shows Off Mathieu Amalric's Directing Chops

Mathieu Amalric's The Blue Room is a hard film to like-- its tone is cold and distant. But it is precisely designed that way to accompany in showing the mind of its passive protagonist. Based on the book of the... More »
  

New York 2014 Review: 3D As Visual Art Form In Godard's GOODBYE TO LANGUAGE

3D seems like it is here to stay, for now. It was a gimmick to win back the audiences the film industry lost to the emergence of TV in the 50s, now it is revived as a last ditch effort... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: Spike Jonze's HER Is The New Anthem Of The Millennial Generation

It's hard to believe that Her is only Spike Jonze's fourth feature film since he has been in our pop-culture consciousness for a long time. With his innovative music videos and films, he's always been creating worlds that are both... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: THE MISSING PICTURE, A Hauntingly Poetic Work of Emotional and Historical Archeology

Cambodian filmmaker Rithy Panh has devoted his career to documenting the brutal horrors perpetrated on his homeland by the genocidal Khmer Rouge regime, who for four nightmarish years from 1975 to 1979 subjected the citizens under their control to forced... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: WHEN EVENING FALLS ON BUCHAREST OR METABOLISM Interrogates The Film Medium With Elegance And Sly Humor

Corneliu Porumboiu, with just three features now under his belt, has established himself as one of the finest filmmakers of the Romanian new wave. His previous films 12:08 East of Bucharest (2006) and Police, Adjective (2009) impressed film festival audiences... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: ABUSE OF WEAKNESS Turns The True Story Of A Conman's Swindle Into Fascinating But Frustratingly Opaque Art

In 2004, French director Catherine Breillat, famous for making very personal and sexually provocative films such as 36 Fillette (1988), Romance (1999), and Fat Girl (2001), suffered a debilitating stroke caused by a cerebral hemorrhage. This stroke partially paralyzed her... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: Joanna Hogg's EXHIBITION, Exceptional 'Scenes From A Marriage'

British filmmaker Joanna Hogg, along with Mexico's Fernando Eimbcke, has been chosen for FSLC's The Emerging Artists Program, part of this year's New York Film Festival. They are playing all three feature films by her, the latest being Exhibition. Having... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: Praise the Lord! James Franco's CHILD OF GOD Is A Revelation

Love him or hate him, James Franco has one of the more interesting Hollywood careers going these days. My own relationship with the man was born of indifference and suckled at the teat of hatred, thanks in no small part... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: LIKE FATHER, LIKE SON Affectingly Re-examines Nature vs. Nurture

It seems Kore-eda Hirokazu is incapable of making bad movies. The babies-switched-at-birth premise in films is nothing new. But he just makes it so darn affecting and poignant, avoiding all the clichés that go with this kind of blurry-eyed family... More »
  

New York Film Fest 2013 Review: AT BERKELEY, A Fascinating, Immersive Examination of the Famed Educational Institution

For 46 years now and counting, the 83-year old filmmaker Frederick Wiseman has carved out an endlessly fruitful niche within his chosen genre: the examination and function of various institutions. His methodology has remained unchanged since his first films in... More »
  
 
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