Cannes 2015 Review: MEDITERRANEA, A Humanist Masterclass On Society's Forgotten Few

Mediterranea is a powerful neorealist punch, so loaded with prescience, so relevant to our here and now, that it practically explodes off the screen. At one point in the film, a middle class family sits down to dinner and the father... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: SICARIO, A Beautifully Executed Hitman Film

In white writing on a black screen we're taught that Sicario was the name given to Hebrew Zealots (the name means "dagger men") who fought to expel the Romans in Judea. Now the name is used in Mexico to refer... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: OFFICE Works Up An Intriguing Salaryman Chiller

Life is hard for the average Korean salaryman, and sometimes that engenders a need to blow off a little steam. For many that involves drinking to excess, but for others it can spill over into the homestead. New Korean horror-thriller... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: INSIDE OUT, A New Pixar Classic

It's no small coincidence that as Pixar enters its cinematic adolescence, it showcases a film that deals with the challenges of growing up. After changing the world of animation with Toy Story, they rode a meteoric rise, crafting some of... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: MY GOLDEN DAYS, Nicotine-Fuelled, Incredibly French and Incredibly Good

Those allergic to French film clichés should consider running in terror from My Golden Days. The hits are all there in director Arnaud Desplechin's latest, a pseudo-prequel to his even more comically cliché-titled My Sex Life... or How I... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: AMY Beautifully Celebrates A Wonderful And Tragic Life

Every so often a film will come along that redefines an entire genre of cinema. A film that excels so completely the result is any similar film gets compared to it for years to come. In 2010, Asif Kapadia did... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Review: TOMORROWLAND, Yearning For The Past, Dripping With Disney Spirit

Four years after the greatly entertaining Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol, Brad Bird tackles the live action dimension for a second time with Tomorrowland, a massive sci-fi production intended for the whole family. Despite a rather enjoyable first part and Bird's... More »
  

Cannes 2015 Review: CAROL, Tremendously Accomplished, Yet Cold

Todd Haynes' Carol is an objectively beautiful film. It is exquisitely acted, hauntingly shot and meticulously well-designed. And it left me surprisingly cold. The same-sex melodrama presents an interesting case where form and content match up a little too well.... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: GREEN ROOM Doesn't Pull A Single Punch

Some gigs really aren't worth taking. That's a maxim that the members of broke touring punk band Ain't Rights probably haven't heard of and certainly aren't going to adhere to when they get offered $350 to play a backwater skinhead... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Review: POUND OF FLESH Is Soft In All The Wrong Places

Jean-Claude Van Damme continues to explore and embrace his darker side in this modest Asian action thriller, as a kidnap & rescue specialist who falls foul of organ traffickers in the Philippines. Sadly, budgetary constraints and a lack of interesting... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: SEA OF TREES, Glimpses Of Beauty Within A Poisoned Forest

It's never a good thing when a film gets booed, but it happens more frequently at Cannes than anywhere in my experience. Often this booing takes on a kind of group think, with headlines all over the world declaring the... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: IRRATIONAL MAN, Woody Allen's Maudlin, Disappointing Trifle

Let's make this perfectly clear - Woody Allen, director, is one of the most unique and prolific talents in the history of cinema. Every year we get a film on schedule, often a chatty and intellectually rich ensemble piece... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: COIN LOCKER GIRL Offers New Perspectives On Standard Thrills

Against a parking lot bursting with saturated colors, a person lies on the ground, at the mercy of another standing above them who wields a sashimi knife still dripping red from its last kill. Dark, bloody and stylish, this could... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: BOMBAY VELVET Takes A Gorgeous Look At Jazz Age Hoodlums

If there's anything that Bombay Velvet director Anurag Kashyap has taught us over his last couple of films, it's that he knows how to stage a rousing action sequence. Not only did he create the greatest gangster film of the... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: THE LOBSTER Starts Strong But Loses Its Way

Boy, I wanted to love this movie. Really, I did. I mean, the first shot of the film is a delight - a woman is passively driving in a car. She gets out, windshield wipers still flailing away, and... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: THE SHAMELESS Delivers Hardboiled Melodrama With Top Drawer Performances

"Learn the rules like a pro, so you can break them like an artist." -Pablo Picasso Today's Korea, whether looking at its entertainment, fashion or culinary scenes, is a society awash with fusion. Nowhere is this more true than in... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: GOOD KILL Intelligently Examines Drone Warfare

"Keep compartmentalizing" is a piece of advice from a commanding officer to his ace pilot. This is darkly humourous, intelligent screenwriting because these drone-piloting soldiers spend 12 hours a day literally inside a box, albeit an air-conditioned one filled... More »
By Kurt Halfyard   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: THE ANARCHISTS Cares Not For Your Bourgeois Cinematic Ideals

How do you say "awards-bait" in French? Take two of the hottest young stars in France, team them up with a rising star director, and then give them a period topic with obvious shades of hot button current events. The... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: SON OF SAUL, A Wrenching, Riveting Holocaust Tale

Son of Saul has two obvious strikes against it. It's a handheld, close POV movie, usually the sign of filmmakers too austere to pick up a tripod, eschewing good framing in favour of shakycam "grit." Then there's the subject... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: SLEEPING GIANT, Provocative And Probing

Despite a seemingly endless number of tries, pulling off the 'coming-of-age' film well is miserably difficult. There's a balance between precociousness versus pandering that makes the balance extremely delicate, as complex and awkward as any pubescence. When it goes... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  
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