NY Indian Film Fest 2016 Review: KHOYA, A Drama About Displacement, Loss, And The Dangerous Nature Of Truth

Being a film writer has its ups and downs. We are constantly inundated by wannabe filmmakers looking to make their mark on the world. Like any other aspirational pursuit, the vast majority of the output from these cold calls is... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

NY Indian Film Fest 2016 Review: CRIME IS PUNISHMENT, The Tamil New Wave Rolls On

M. Manikandan is one of a small group of filmmakers from Tamil Nadu who are a hair's breath away from making a huge international splash. Two years ago his film Kaaka Muttai (The Crow's Egg) wowed Toronto IFF audiences with... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Cannes 2016 Review: JULIETA, Beauty Without Substance

Alfred Hitchcock once said, 'Drama is life with the dull bits cut out'. To twist that a bit, Pedro Almodóvar's new feature film Julieta is a slice of life with the drama cut out. The story of one woman's journey... More »
  

Cannes 2016 Review: THE NICE GUYS, A Trifle With Great Chemistry

"I'm getting too old for this shit". Immortal lines of cinematic splendour, words so titanic that if the scribe of Lethal Weapon had only been responsible for these, then he'd be legendary. Yet Shane Black has done more than write... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2016 Review: AMERICAN HONEY Captures A Generation's Spirit With Aplomb

Only a few times in a generation does a film speak to youth in a lasting and powerful way. Films like Rebel Without A Cause, Easy Rider, and Kids all tapped into their respective contemporary consciousnesses with the effect of... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Cannes 2016 Review: RAW, A Terrifying and Gripping Evisceration

It's hard to maintain one's identity when university begins; or perhaps more to the point, find your identity under enormous pressure to do well in school, adapt to life without constant parental supervision, not to mentions the pressures of the... More »
  

Cannes 2016 Review: THE HANDMAIDEN, A Breathtaking And Twisted Lesbian Thriller

Following his Hollywood foray Stoker, Park Chan-wook returns to (mostly) home soil for his sumptuous and sensual adaptation of Sarah Waters' Fingersmith. Transposing the novel's setting from Victorian England to 1930s Korea and Japan, when the former was a colony... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Cannes 2016 Review: CLOSE ENCOUNTERS WITH VILMOS ZSIGMOND, A Sparkling Tribute

From the opening shot where the subject is adjusting the lighting, tweaking the seating height, futzing with back illumination and checking the camera's gamma, you know that Close Encounters With Vilmos Zsigmond is not an everyday documentary. But Vilmos... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2016 Review: TRAIN TO BUSAN, A Zombie Thrillride With Social Bite

For his live-action debut Train to Busan, indie animation director Yeon Sang-ho, whose films The King of Pigs and The Fake have drawn international acclaim, has taken the zombie thriller, stuck it into the claustrophobic confines of a train, and... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: KILL ZONE 2, A Delirious, Masterfully Staged Martial Arts Melodrama

Never fear the “2” in the title of Soi Cheang’s deliriously baroque, thrillingly action-packed extravaganza Kill Zone 2, better known in Asia (and to early film festival viewers) as SPL 2: A Time for Consequences.   This is a follow-up,... More »
  

Tribeca 2016 Review: ALWAYS SHINE, In Which The Hollywood Dream Factory Becomes A Nightmare

Director Sophia Takal more than fulfills the considerable promise of her debut Green with her second feature, a film that often looks, acts and feels like a thriller/horror flick, but at its heart is a dramatic treatise on the tyranny... More »
  

Review: THE DARKNESS Inhabits The Creepy Edge Of Suburbia

For his latest adventure in suspense, director Greg McLean reins in the blood and guts to focus on a family under attack by forces both interior and exterior. McLean established his international reputation with the gruesome Wolf Creek more than... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: FYNBOS, Brilliantly Anti-Cathartic Cinema

A young white woman in high heels walks down a street in a black working-class neighborhood. Though clearly on edge, she walks with a purpose. She pauses at a row of trash cans. Clothes billow in the wind, threaded on... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Cannes 2016 Review: THE WAILING, A Bone-Chilling, Thunderous Descent Into Hell

After turning the Korean thriller on its head with The Chaser and The Yellow Sea, director Na Hong-jin has reinvented himself again, aggressively pushing against the boundaries of genre cinema with The Wailing. A deafening descent into hell, it may... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

NY Indian Film Fest 2016: SAHEB BIBI GOLAAM, A Bengali Triptych Thriller

A hitman, a hooker, and a hustler all with hearts of gold: these are the three main characters in Pratim D. Gupta's latest thriller, Saheb Bibi Golaam (The Drifters). Except, these three aren't exactly virtuous, they have their pecadillos and... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: I AM THALENTE Skates With Soul

We all know the sound. That clack-scrape-whoosh of a skateboard on the sidewalk. For many of us it is as close to the sport as we get. When we hear that sound most of us move out of the way... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: SUNSET SONG, An Impeccable Masterpiece From Director Terence Davies

A sweeping tale of changing times in Scotland in the early 20th century, Terence Davies's new film Sunset Song centers around a farm girl Chris Guthrie (Agyness Deyn) in the fictional rural town of Kinraddie near Aberdeen. Chris is a thoroughly... More »
By Dustin Chang   
  

Review: LAST DAYS IN THE DESERT, A Wandering Christ Parable

Director Rodrigo García's minimalist Christ-centered parable on fathers and sons pivots the holy man as everyman and observer. It's an approach that feels of merit: one that ultimately doesn't see earth-bound humanity and a more intangible sense of spirituality as... More »
By Ben Umstead   
  

Review: MONEY MONSTER Takes A Hostage With A Sense Of Humor

Pleasantly surprising, Jodie Foster's Money Monster is better than expected, in large part because it's not as straightforward as it initially appears. The setup, in fact, leads one to believe that the movie will be a deadly serious hostage thriller.... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Cannes 2016 Review: Woody Allen Visits CAFÉ SOCIETY

You ever see the Woody Allen film about the older man who’s in love with a younger woman, only to have her torn between her affection for another nebbishy guy? Sure it’s fair to say that Allen’s treading on familiar... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  
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