Review: LOCAL GOD, Surreal Horror Of The Creative Process

In his first feature film The Silent House, director Gustavo Hernández told a familiar haunted house story in a unfamiliar way, by shooting it in a single take. For his second feature, Local God, he again approaches a familiar... More »
  

Review: Rajkumar Hirani's PK Ticks All The Right Bollywood Boxes

It's been five years since Bollywood blockbuster specialist Rajkumar Hirani destroyed box office records and made international waves with 3 Idiots. That film, with the help of an endearing lead performance from 40 something Aamir Khan as a college student,... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Review: NATURAL DISASTERS (Desastres Naturales), A Funny Political Film About Students And Teachers

It's not usual to find a director under the age of 25 who actually promises not only a style but also an attitude towards the filmmaking space that he inhabits. That is the case of Chilean director Bernardo Quesney, who with... More »
  

Review: WINTER SLEEP, What Does It Mean To Be 'Good'?

Nuri Bilge Ceylan trained as a photographer and has mined the expressive terrain of his native Anatolia to great effect throughout his career. As a director, he has used the landscape not simply as a backdrop, but often as an... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Review: MR. TURNER, A Film That Loses Its Focus

Mike Leigh's latest offering lustfully tackles the life, work and loves of Joseph Mallord William Turner, the legendary 19th Century British artist whose landscape paintings are revered around the world. Mr. Turner is a carefully constructed film, part performance piece... More »
  

Review: THE INTERVIEW Deserves To Be More Than A Footnote

In 1940, just months after Wermacht tanks rolled over their borders in lightning strikes, a film came out that made the elected leader of Germany look like the fatuous lunatic that he was. Playing both the Jewish Barber and... More »
  

Book Review: BE SAND, NOT OIL - THE LIFE AND WORK OF AMOS VOGEL Or The Almost Lost Subversion In Cinema

When people attain a fascination with the medium of film they rarely choose a career in education. More often they become filmmakers, film critics (which is or at least should be some kind of education) and most often (like all... More »
  

Review: SyFy Returns To Space With Mini Series ASCENSION

SyFy returned to the space last night with Ascension, its first scripted space opera since Battlestar Galactica. Some 51 years after launching an interstellar spacecraft into space, the crew of the Ascension, descendants of the original crew, are almost at the point... More »
  

Review: CHILDREN, A Lyrical Look At Patrimonial Relationships And Moral Crises

After Juraj Lehotský´s recent Miracle, Jaro Vojtek, another Slovak documentarian, has turned to fiction territory, debuting with the gently titled film Children. Vojtek is no stranger to the domestic audience. He rose to prominence with the documentary Here We Are... More »
  

Review: Superstar Rajini's LINGAA, For Super Fans Only

At this point in his career, Rajnikanth is more than simply a performer, he is an icon. The highest paid actor in South Asia, Rajini films draw fanatical crowds not only in Tamil Nadu, but around the world. So much... More »
By J Hurtado   
  

Blu-ray Review: KILL LA KILL Kicks Ass And Has A UK Boxset

(For those with a sailor-suit fetish and/or a certain sense of humor, Christmas sure has arrived early...) Confession time: when the first trailer and images of the anime series Kill La Kill appeared on the Internet last year, I thought... More »
By Ard Vijn   
  

Review: MAGICIAN, A Massive Collage Tribute To Orson Welles

In Magician: The Astonishing Life and Work of Orson Welles, documentarian Chuck Workman, best known for his assembled clips for the Oscar ceremonies, including In Memoriam segments, doesn't have to do much to enhance the drama in Welles' life because... More »
  

Review: TOP FIVE, Chris Rock's Very Funny And Most Personal Film Yet

Rude, crude, and lewd as it is, Top Five is still a big step forward for Chris Rock as a filmmaker. In essence, that's because it more closely resembles his brilliant stand-up shows, where he gets on a roll and... More »
  

Review: INHERENT VICE, Say Hello To The American Psyche, Circa 1970

Paul Thomas Anderson faithfully adapts Thomas Pynchon's most accessible novel, the zaniest surf noir, Inherent Vice. It is also the first time he's worked with a large ensemble cast since Magnolia. The result is often hilarious, a laborious snapshot of... More »
  

Mórbido Mérida 2014 Review: JIRON, How A Movie By A Major Filmmaker Disappeared

Full disclosure: I was completely ignorant of Mexican filmmaker Carlos Enrique Taboada before watching this movie. Thus, Jirón (Shred), a new documentary by Christian Cueva, proved to be educational, fascinating, and compelling, not only because it explores the disappearance of... More »
  

Blu-Ray Review: KINGDOM OF HEAVEN Ultimate Edition - A Primer for EXODUS

A decade before Ridley Scott brought Exodus: Gods and Kings to the big screen, he tackled another epic about religion, faith and pragmatism. Kingdom of Heaven was Scott's film about the Crusades, a rousing, rambunctious film that tried to... More »
  

Japan Film Festival 2014 Review: TOKYO REFUGEES Clumsily Critiques Contemporary Japan

Director Kiyoshi Sasabe (My SO Has Depression) is no stranger to dark narratives, and his latest, Tokyo Refugees, could be his darkest yet. Based on the many seedy and sad things you may have heard about Tokyo, the film aims to... More »
  

Japan Film Festival 2014 Review: RUROUNI KENSHIN: THE LEGEND ENDS Caps An Explosive Trilogy

By this stage, the humble tale of the first film and the bombastic masterfully shot darkness of the second film should prepare you for what is in store in Rurouni Kenshin: The Legend Ends. Namely, a lot of exposition, happenstance... More »
  

Review: ODE TO MY FATHER Puts Blockbuster Spin On Melodrama

Family takes centre stage in Ode to My Father, a new Korean melodrama that is every bit as bombastic as this year's naval battle hit Roaring Currents. Directed by JK Youn (Youn Je-kyun), whose last film Haeundae sauntered over the... More »
  

Review: WILD, Featuring A Committed And Captivating Reese Witherspoon

Taking on another true story after his hugely successful Dallas Buyer's Club, director Jean-Marc Vallée this time turns his lens to the story of Cheryl Strayed, a woman with a past who takes it upon herself to hike hundreds of... More »
  
 
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