Cannes 2015 Review: KRISHA Introduces An Exciting New Director In The Home Movie From Hell

Jean-Luc Godard once said that all you need for a movie is a gun and a girl. With Krisha, a rich psychological thriller about family secrets, mental-breakdown and addiction, director Trey Edward Shults proves that one can make compelling... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Review: POLTERGEIST, A Remake That Resembles The Original A Little Too Closely

"They're here!" The original Poltergeist looms large in modern popular culture, the 1982 film having grown in stature over the years to the point where it's considered a classic of the haunted house genre. Indeed, the original is a very... More »
By Peter Martin   
  

Review: WHEN MARNIE WAS THERE, A Melancholy Animated Mystery

Studio Ghibli and its catalogue of extraordinary animated films has been built on the back of two men: the creator of its most beloved characters and star of the studio, Miyazaki Hayao and the often over-looked, but no less talented,... More »
  

Review: ALOFT, The Tension Between Magic Realism And Harsh Reality

The sense of touch can be tricky to convey in film. A filmmaker must rely upon visually accurate information in order for the spectator to 'feel' the sensation. Touch is very prominent in director and writer Claudia Llosa's Aloft, how... More »
  

Cannes 2015 Review: Noé's LOVE Is Both Sticky and Sweet

Gaspar Noé. For some even the name sends shudders. Thoughts of the visually bombastic Enter the Void cause a kind of PTSD, and his Irreversable still haunts some 13 years on. The Argentine-born, France-based director occupies a unique and... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: Wrestling With THE ASSASSIN's Beautiful Nothing

The first thing that strikes you in The Assassin is the quiet. Hou Hsiao-Hsien's ruminative tone-poem, about a Tang Dynasty sell-sword tasked with killing kin, is a remarkably hushed affair. Be it dialogue, sound-effects or music, at no point does... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: MOUNTAINS MAY DEPART Displays Creative Artistry But Flawed Vision

Director Jia Zhang-ke is a big fan of segmented narratives. His last film, A Touch of Sin, was an anthology of sorts tackling different stories surrounding the larger topic of the the modernization of Chinese culture. In his latest film,... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: MADONNA, A Riveting Tale Of Sorrow And Redemption

Following her accomplished sophomore film, the absorbing high school revenge tale Pluto (2012), Shin Su-won returns in glorious fashion with the searing Madonna. Meticulous, layered and yet seemingly effortless, this rewarding tale of mingled sorrow and redemption should go a... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Review: DESAPARECER, A Jungle-Set Thriller That Raises The Bar

Desaparecer is Dorian Fernández-Moris' third film in two years. Moving away from the found footage horror format of his previous pictures, Cementerio General and Secreto Matusita, the director is now trying his hand at an action thriller, and despite some... More »
  

Cannes 2015 Review: MEDITERRANEA, A Humanist Masterclass On Society's Forgotten Few

Mediterranea is a powerful neorealist punch, so loaded with prescience, so relevant to our here and now, that it practically explodes off the screen. At one point in the film, a middle class family sits down to dinner and the father... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: SICARIO, A Beautifully Executed Hitman Film

In white writing on a black screen we're taught that Sicario was the name given to Hebrew Zealots (the name means "dagger men") who fought to expel the Romans in Judea. Now the name is used in Mexico to refer... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: OFFICE Works Up An Intriguing Salaryman Chiller

Life is hard for the average Korean salaryman, and sometimes that engenders a need to blow off a little steam. For many that involves drinking to excess, but for others it can spill over into the homestead. New Korean horror-thriller... More »
By Pierce Conran   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: INSIDE OUT, A New Pixar Classic

It's no small coincidence that as Pixar enters its cinematic adolescence, it showcases a film that deals with the challenges of growing up. After changing the world of animation with Toy Story, they rode a meteoric rise, crafting some of... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: MY GOLDEN DAYS, Nicotine-Fuelled, Incredibly French and Incredibly Good

Those allergic to French film clichés should consider running in terror from My Golden Days. The hits are all there in director Arnaud Desplechin's latest, a pseudo-prequel to his even more comically cliché-titled My Sex Life... or How I... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: AMY Beautifully Celebrates A Wonderful And Tragic Life

Every so often a film will come along that redefines an entire genre of cinema. A film that excels so completely the result is any similar film gets compared to it for years to come. In 2010, Asif Kapadia did... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Review: TOMORROWLAND, Yearning For The Past, Dripping With Disney Spirit

Four years after the greatly entertaining Mission Impossible: Ghost Protocol, Brad Bird tackles the live action dimension for a second time with Tomorrowland, a massive sci-fi production intended for the whole family. Despite a rather enjoyable first part and Bird's... More »
  

Cannes 2015 Review: CAROL, Tremendously Accomplished, Yet Cold

Todd Haynes' Carol is an objectively beautiful film. It is exquisitely acted, hauntingly shot and meticulously well-designed. And it left me surprisingly cold. The same-sex melodrama presents an interesting case where form and content match up a little too well.... More »
By Ben Croll   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: GREEN ROOM Doesn't Pull A Single Punch

Some gigs really aren't worth taking. That's a maxim that the members of broke touring punk band Ain't Rights probably haven't heard of and certainly aren't going to adhere to when they get offered $350 to play a backwater skinhead... More »
By Ryland Aldrich   
  

Review: POUND OF FLESH Is Soft In All The Wrong Places

Jean-Claude Van Damme continues to explore and embrace his darker side in this modest Asian action thriller, as a kidnap & rescue specialist who falls foul of organ traffickers in the Philippines. Sadly, budgetary constraints and a lack of interesting... More »
By James Marsh   
  

Cannes 2015 Review: SEA OF TREES, Glimpses Of Beauty Within A Poisoned Forest

It's never a good thing when a film gets booed, but it happens more frequently at Cannes than anywhere in my experience. Often this booing takes on a kind of group think, with headlines all over the world declaring the... More »
By Jason Gorber   
  
 
  Next »
Page 1 of 426