Watch The Trailer For Wes Anderson's GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL

Todd Brown, Founder and Editor
Many love him. Many hate him. And after the runaway success of Moonrise Kingdom, director Wes Anderson is back with The Grand Budapest Hotel. Written, directed and produced by Anderson from an original story by Anderson and Hugo Guinness, The Grand Budapest Hotel features much of the familiar Anderson ensemble along with a batch of new faces including Ralph Fiennes, Tony Revolori, F. Murray Abraham, Mathieu Amalric, Adrien Brody, Willem Dafoe, Jeff Goldblum, Jude Law, Bill Murray, Edward Norton, Saoirse Ronan, 
Jason Schwartzman, Tilda Swinton, Tom Wilkinson, and Owen Wilson. Also, if the trailer is to be believed, it's shot mostly in a 4:3 aspect ratio and is absolutely bloody hilarious.

THE GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL recounts the adventures of Gustave H, a legendary concierge at a famous European hotel between the wars, and Zero Moustafa, the lobby boy who becomes his most trusted friend.  The story involves the theft and recovery of a priceless Renaissance painting and the battle for an enormous family fortune -- all against the back-drop of a suddenly and dramatically changing Continent.

The first trailer has just arrived online. Check it out below and weigh in.
Around the Internet:
  • mightyjoeyoung

    "Many love him. Many hate him."

    Well....I belong to the love camp......always has.

    Very nice trailer and......Fiennes better be careful......I wonder if Besson ever wants to do a Arsène Lupin film, I guess Fiennes could play the lead.

    Thanks Mr Brown.

  • Mina Bontempo

    Pass me the bucket. That looked bloody horrible.

    Like a mix between Around the World in 80 Days, High Spirits, Duck Soup, and God knows what else, which would be promising if it weren't, as it seems to be, so soullessly laborious.

  • Jox

    Don't we usually use "1.33:1" to denominate theatrical film aspect ratios?

  • They're both in common use. And the general rule in the rest of the world in all areas is that you reduce ratios down to the smallest full numbers possible and don't use decimal points.

  • Marc Clement

    I love it already!

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