Watch The Trailer For Kim Ki-duk's MOEBIUS

Todd Brown, Founder and Editor
South korean director Kim Ki-duk has never been a stranger to controversy but even by his standards Moebius has had a difficult trip to the screen. Effectively banned in Korea, the original version of the picture has undergone significant changes to be cleared for exhibition and will soon be bowing to audiences in Venice and Toronto.

And it's from Toronto that we come by some major tidbits from the film. First, a very detailed program note that tells us more than we've known so far about the film. And, second, a trailer. Check it below.

South Korea's celebrated perennial provocateur Kim Ki-duk (Pieta) returns with this twisted family chronicle perched somewhere between psychological thriller, grotesque comedy, and perverse ode to the pleasures of sadomasochism.

One of the most powerful and controversial films of the last decade. Moebius is Korean maestro-provocateur Kim Ki-duk's most audacious work to date -- and that's saying something. This disturbing yet cathartic film is a potent metaphor for a contemporary society morbidly obsessed with its own sexuality. It is also a reflection on incest, and that visceral bond that connects each of us to the parents who made us -- in an endless loop like the "Möebius strip" suggested by the title.

Observed by their adolescent son (Seo Young-ju), a couple's fight over the husband's infidelity turns to a grotesque calamity. After failing to sever her husband's penis, the infuriated wife chooses instead to dismember her son in order to hurt his father. Family violence sparks a chain of events that culminates in a dramatic epilogue of destruction.

Not a silent film but a wordless one, Moebius bears the clear mark of Kim's singular genius. It's a modern Greek tragedy bordering on psychological thriller, a pitchblack comedy, a crazy-weird depiction of pain-induced pleasure -- in all cases, a sheer work of art, lucid and coherent in its shocking madness. Extracting remarkable performances from Cho Jae-hyun as the father, Lee Eun-woo as both the mother and the husband's lover, and especially from Seo, Kim once again rewards his valiant audience with mesmerizing art. This is pure cinema -- at its most brilliantly transgressive.

Around the Internet:
  • HYDRA

    Lower budget than I expected.

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