Now on Blu-ray: ANY DAY NOW Showcases Alan Cumming, Garret Dillahunt, and the Challenges for Gay Couples

Peter Martin, Managing Editor

Sterling performances by Alan Cumming and Garret Dillahunt help elevate Any Day Now above a premise that may sound quite familiar: a non-traditional couple runs into trouble when they try to adopt a special-needs child.

Set in West Hollywood, California, in 1979, the original screenplay by Travis Fine and George Arthur Bloom, inspired by a true story, sets up one stereotype after another, only to topple them gently. Rudy (Cumming) is performing in a nightclub when he locks eyes with Paul (Dillahunt). They adjourn to Paul's car for a quick tryst and the promise of a future meeting.

When Rudy returns home, he discovers that next-door neighbor Marco (Isaac Leyva), a teenage boy with Down's syndrome, has been left abandoned by the arrest of his mother. Rudy's parental instincts kick in, simultaneous with the blooming of his relationship with Paul. Soon enough, the three form a close, happy family bond, which is eventually threatened by prevailing societal norms that echo down to this day.

While Cumming has the more showy role, befitting his character in the film, Dillahunt is a good match as an increasingly attuned and passionate domestic partner. The supporting cast is filled out nicely with solid turns by Kelli Williams, Chris Mulkey, Gregg Henry, Don Franklin, and Frances Fisher, among others. Rachel Morrison's cinematography, Elizabeth Garner's production design, Tom Cross' editing, and Joey Newman's musical score all complement the film beautifully.

Thanks to well-modulated direction by Travis Fine, Any Day Now avoids hammering away with blunt force at easy targets, or ladling on an abundance of unearned sentimentality. Instead, raw emotions are allowed to seep through, revealing the lasting damage that comes from adhering to the letter of the law rather than a spirit of humanity.


Music Box Films has made the film available on both Blu-ray and DVD. The Blu-ray sports a lovely, warm transfer, as might be expected from a recently-made film. Supplemental features include "Making Any Day Now" (17 minutes), which features interviews with the key talent, in front of and behind the camera; "Meeting Isaac Leyva," a quick interview with the lovable first-time actor; "Isaac's Audition," lasting two minutes; and the theatrical trailer.

The impact of Any Day Now grows slowly throughout the film; the final images are pensive and moving, throwing daggers at the heart that land with pinpoint accuracy.

Any Day Now can be ordered at a variety of online retailers, including via our affiliate link at Amazon.com.

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