Meeting The Criterion: THE MAN WHO KNEW TOO MUCH (1934), Nolan's FOLLOWING, THE QATSI TRILOGY, BRAZIL

Behold the tale of how I came to dive deep into The Criterion Collection

Almost all of us own the stray Criterion disc or two of our favorite films. Some of us have dozens of Criterion titles but collect far more than we watch, content to let that growing number of numbered spines make us look more cinematically well-rounded than we really are. That was me anyway, Mr. Comfort Zone, happy to pick up The Blob or Godzilla or Carnival of Souls but far less likely to try the experimental films of Stan Brakhage, or the work of people like Godard, Rosselini, Tati, Bergman, Tarkovsky... the list had no end. 

The list still has no end. Join me on my journey. I hope to use the Criterion Collection to challenge you to go out beyond your comfort zone to find feel and reflect on what film means to you and why it has been as powerful a medium in your life as it has in mine. 

Maybe your first Chaplin awaits? Or your first Neorealist film? New Wave? Kurosawa? Uzo? Vintage Japanese horror and sci-fi? Or a trip through Maysles Grey Gardens? Wherever you wind up, it will be richer for each step through the greatest collection of film under one label that the world has ever seen. 

Please begin by watching the video below. 
Around the Internet:
  • Theorist Complex

    "Almost all of us own the stray Criterion disc or two of our favorite films. Some of us have dozens of Criterion titles but collect far more
    than we watch, content to let that growing number of numbered spines
    make us look more cinematically well-rounded than we really are."

    It seems that you left out those of us that own hundreds of Criterion discs, watch them all, numerous times, and actually enjoy them.

  • Dave Canfield

    LOL You guys don't worry me in the slightest. But having a huge Criterion collection that one doesn't actually watch much? I have seen it happen all the time. Of course at this point I own well over two hundred myself and watch them constantly. In fact I often find it odd that when I do watch movies they are usually Criterion or Shout Factory releases these days.

  • spongebob

    Could you please look into the camera when you do the show? Or don't shoot yourself at all just do a voiceover.

  • Dave Canfield

    Will do. I'm actually moving over to recording with an SLR and a lighting rig soon and will be utilizing a lighting rig and mic so look for the show to get even more professional looking as time goes by.

  • mightyjoeyoung

    "Some of us have dozens of Criterion titles"

    Well, I haven´t gotten so far yet but I own a few, I love them.

    Of course there are some that are OOP like the RoboCop(1987) edition, Lat sau san taam/Hard Boiled(1992) and of course I want those too.

    Looking forward to your review of Bergmans Sommarnattens leende/Smiles of a Summer Night (1955) on Criterion, the extra material featuring was a bit disappointing.

    You had troubles defending 3 disc version of Brazil(1985)?

    Try defending La battaglia di Algeri/The Battle of Algiers (1966) 3 disc version, french B&W.....most women just stare at you and then begin to laugh......but you say one thing about Twilight (2008)........sigh.
    Thanks again Mr Canfield.

  • Dave Canfield

    Hi mightyjoeyoung. Always a pleasure to hear from you. I have more Out of Print titles as time goes by but haven't been hardcore enough to pick up Hard Boiled or The Third Man (BluRay). I do love Bergman and haven't seen that disc yet (although I do have it :) so look for a few thoughts on it soon. I did indeed have trouble explaining Brazil to the wife- then again she is my balance in all things cinema, a constant reminder that art is for life and not the other way around. Twilight and Battle of Algiers in the same sentence- my brain hurts!

  • mightyjoeyoung

    Yeah, would love some Bergman DVD reviews.
    Well.....I´m sorry but I do cause some headaches from time to time.

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