THE DEFLOWERING OF EVA VAN END Feels Like Dutch Wes Anderson

Todd Brown, Founder and Editor
Quirky characters, meticulous framing, and a devotion to finely detailed art design all coupled to an underlying sincerity that (hopefully) keeps it all from becoming unbearably self referential. It's the formula that has served Wes Anderson well throughout his career and all of those characteristics look to be abundantly present in Michiel ten Horn's The Deflowering Of Eva van End.

THE DEFLOWERING OF EVA VAN END is a tragicomedy about the Van End family who, after the arrival of an impossibly perfect German exchange student, can no longer imagine how they ever managed to live with their imperfect selves.

Evert (48), Etty (46), Erwin (20), Manuel (16) and Eva (15) are a perfectly normal family, who over the years have developed a slightly dysfunctional way of relating to one another.
Then, all of a sudden, the incarnation of perfection enters their lives, embodied by German exchange student Veit (17). With his arrival, doubt, insecurity, fear and desire invade the Van End family. How have they been able to function all these years, with all of their imperfections?

During the course of Veit's stay, all five family members start to reinvent themselves, as they feel increasingly alienated from themselves and from each other. It turns out, however, that it's not perfection that brings happiness, but their blood ties. And besides, nobody's really perfect...
Selected as part of the Discovery program at the Toronto International Film Festival, The Deflowering Of Eva van End is now approaching its Dutch theatrical release and a full theatrical trailer has just been released. Check it below.

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