Poland Delivers A Most Unusual Heist Film With 80 MILLION

Todd Brown, Founder and Editor
Ah, the heist film. We've all seen a ton of them and half of the joy is seeing how people will manipulate the very familiar formula to keep things feeling fresh. But every now and then someone finds a completely different approach into the genre and Waldemar Krzystek's 80 Million is very definitely one of those cases. Forget about your typical gang of charming criminals pulling off the job, these people aren't criminals at all. At least not by any contemporary standards. No, what we have here is a period piece tracking political activists pulling off a job against the ruling Communist forces. The film was pitched like this at the Gdynia Film Festival:

Lower Silesia, the autumn of 1981. After a series of provocations by the Security Service, the confrontation of the opposition with the Communists seems to be inevitable. Shortly before the announcement of martial law, young activists of the Solidarity movement agree to play va banque and organize a daring action of withdrawing 80 million federal money from a bank in Wroclaw before the account is blocked. Security Service follows them step by step. An exciting game begins, involving the clergy and money-changers. Each party has aces up their sleeves.

The trailer here is exciting, smartly energetic stuff that nails the period setting. Take a look below.
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  • mightyjoeyoung

    "But every now and then someone finds a completely different approach into the genre and Waldemar Krzystek's 80 Million is very definitely one of those cases."
    Seems that way, judging from the nicely subbed trailer, thanks, Mr Brown.

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