Rani Mukherjee's Dreams Come True In The Latest Clip From AIYYAA

J Hurtado, Contributing Writer

I can't honestly say that the upcoming film from first time Hindi director Sachin Kundalkar, Aiyyaa, is particularly Twitch-y looking material, but I'll be damned if it doesn't look like a shitload of fun!

Aiyyaa is the story of Meenakshi Deshpande (Rani Mukherjee), a southern masala enthusiast who tries to live her life like the characters in the films she loves so much. She laughs big, she cries big, she does everything big, and when it's time to get her married off, she won't settle for anything other that her ideal filmi hero. In this case that hero is Surya, played by hunky Malayalam film icon Prithviraj. Meenakshi is lured in by his entoxicating musk and follows her nose around hoping desperately to nab Surya for her own.

This first non-trailer promotional clip is the music video for the song Dreamum Wakeuppam Critical Conditionum (south Indian semi-English dialect, not unlike last summer's major breakout Tamil hit Why This Kolaveri Di?). The song is pure southie film fantasy, the kind of song Indian regional film fans went nuts for in the '70s and '80s that still linger in many movies made specifically for rural audiences.

There is something about the twinkle in Mukherjee's eyes that sells this elaborate concoction and reminds me why she's such a big star. Very few actresses exude the kind of joy that Rani Mukherjee does on screen; this looks like a role built for her, and I'm really excited to check it out.

If you've never seen a classic south Indian film, check out this clip to get an idea of what you've been missing.

Around the Internet:
  • indian

    the south indian movies did have songs like this earlier,anyways its a film n please people with political attitude need not respond,enjoy the movie

  • jayan

    politics?
    what?

  • jayan

    south Indian semi-English dialect

    lol what?!???
    you realize that there's no language called south indian,yes?
    i don't know if you heard why this kolaveri di, the english was not pronounced anything close to this.

    if anything, it seems,this is a slightly racist/stereotypical portrayal meant to demean "south Indians" (who btw are not a singular people but rather @ least 4 different peoples). Also, in "South Indian" English is a bit more widely spoken and I promise you they don't butcher it like this video would have you portray.

  • No offense was intended and thusly no apology will be given. I can't imagine you're very familiar with our site or my coverage of Indian cinema, so I'll give you a pass.

    Welcome to Twitch: We're not as dumb as you think.

  • jayan

    i've been here for a while.
    you're not dumb but it seems rather misinformed.

  • Oops! Make that seven, I forgot Marathi and Punjabi

  • If you had been here, you'd know that I've reviewed films in no less than five Indian languages, so yes, I'm aware that there are more than a few.

  • jayan

    ok so what's the deal w/ the generalizations?
    this song is a parody. it's lampooning a *percieved* of south indians (it's not accurate).

    no one in the south speaks like that:dreamum,weakuppam.
    do you not see the biased, demeaning nature of it?

  • No, I do not see the biased, demeaning nature of it at all. It is a celebration of south Indian (most likely Tamil) culture, not an insult.

  • jayan

    mate,
    no one in Tamil Nadu speaks like that. it is a caricature of the way they really speak.
    sigh* are you sure you've seen Tamil movies before?

  • jayan

    Mate,
    i think you don't realize what's going on here. There are lot of deep rooted issues that you need to have an understanding of before you fully comprehend.
    because you reviewed a few movies in different langauges does not give you a deep rooted understanding of the cultural context.

    India is full or racist assholes ( trust me I'm Indian i know). We love hating one another,doesn't matter where from, whom.
    this is not an accurate portrayal. Think Blackface. this is a lampooning, portraying them like bufoons who speak in a funny way. to a racist this may seem like a funny celebration but i assure you of the intentions: they are not benign.

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