Croatia's VEGETARIAN CANNIBAL Shocks And Provokes

Todd Brown, Founder and Editor
Laced with explicit sex, late term abortions and animal violence Branko Schmidt's new Croatian effort Vegetarian Cannibal may very well be this year's A Serbian Film in terms of its willingness to push hot button topics to the extreme in the name of social commentary.

Cineuropa describes the story like this:

Dr Danko Babić (Rene Bitorajac) is a successful gynecologist in his mid-30s. Although clearly an expert in his field, he is an unscrupulously ambitious and utterly despicable person. Babić's best friend is chief police inspector Ilija (Leon Lučev), with whom he takes part in sport-betting scams, and who leads him to 'controversial businessman' Jedinko (Emir Hadžihafizbegović). Jedinko deals in hard drugs and high-end prostitution (naturally, with police support), and needs a gynecologist to take care of his 'employees', meaning doing illegal abortions for the pros. It all represents government, organized crime and corruption working hand-in-hand, typical of Croatian society.
A multiple award winner at the Pula Film Festival - where it took both best director and best actor prizes, among others - the trailer for this one is gritty, nasty stuff. Check it below.

Around the Internet:
  • me me

    The real social commentary is on the reaction of people on the outside of such business...

    in the modern world corruption has two broad definitions
    to the larger but shrinking group its the trade itself.

    but for a surprisingly large and growing group -- corruption merely has do with individuals or small groups being excluded from what they see as simply lucrative trade by monopolistic combinations of government and shadow organizations.

    So if this the film is commentary overall...I suspect the commentary is from the perspective of group 2.

  • Jackyvoe

    For them to say it was intended as social commentary is like Ed Wood saying his movies we intended to be taken seriously. If they really had something of importance to say, they could have done so without shock value for the sake of shock value.

    "The rape in this movie symbolizes how the government rapes our country!" I find that very hard to believe.

  • Having spent a good amount of time with both the director and producer of A Serbian Film in person and emailed with the writer extensively I can say with absolute certainty that it was intended as social commentary. Whether it was successful or not, however, is entirely up to the audience to judge ...

  • Major_Rager

    Hear, hear! Though I love being shocked and disgusted, to say that A Serbian Film had "heavy social commentary" makes me want to vomit. The Life and Death of a Porno Gang, another Serbian film also guilty of being quite extreme, said all the same things ASF purports to have said without being exploitative in the least, and yet it was still about sex, death, drugs, and snuff!

  • Jackyvoe

    I refuse to believe that A Serbian Film was "social commentary." It was the worst kind of exploitation film, and the film makers should be ashamed of trying to make it out to be more than that.

    I really hope this movie actually has a point, and is not just another addition to the contest of "who can make the most disgustingly offensive movie."

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