Review: MAKE-OUT WITH VIOLENCE

One of the best things about independent films is that they are made by filmmakers who have complete creative freedom and do not have to worry about pleasing producers or studio executives. The results are therefore often not only unique and original, but also honest and heartfelt. Make-Out With Violence is one such film. Created by the Deagol Brothers using their limited budget but boundless imagination, the film is indeed unique, original, honest and heartfelt. 

It is the summer after high school graduation for a group of close friends. One member of the group, the beautiful Wendy, has disappeared. The body has not been found, but after an extensive search, she is presumed dead. A special service (i.e. 'a funeral without the body') was held for her, but on the way home, two of her friends find her in the forest tied to a tree. The reunion is not particularly joyful, however, because she has died and turned into a zombie. 

Make-Out With Violence feels like a personal film, and is primarily a film about love, friendship and growing up. The zombie element adds both scares and laughs, but is not the central theme of the movie. The characters feel genuinely real, and are likely based on the filmmakers themselves or people whom they know. The complex relationships between them are portrayed with honesty, something that is so often missing in movies about love and friendship these days. 

Make-Out With Violence is not without flaws. The actors and actresses all do their best, but the performances range from decent to weak. The script is not particularly tight and contains some unlikely plots. It is on the whole, however, a likeable coming of age story that should bring back some bittersweet memories for many viewers. It is a different kind of film, but at the same time an enjoyable one. 


Make-Out With Violence is distributed in Australia by Accent Film, and is now available on DVD.   
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